Skip to item: of 1,782
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎207] (350/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

207
this juncture between Hahmah and the Al Khalifab, and the British
Resident having declined to intervene except on a condition— to which
Rahmah would not agree—that the people of Qatif should be included in
any peace arranged, hostilities were resumed and ended with the destruc
tion of Rahmah and his vessel in a set combat with a ship commanded
by one of the Al ]vhalifah. in his closing years Rahmah was rather a
petty territorial ruler, with head-quarters at Dammam, than a pirate; and
he had always carefully abstained from offences against the British
Government and British subjects ; but his death none the less conduced
to the establishment of a more settled state of affairs in the Persian
Gulf.
On the withdrawal, in or about 1824, of the last of the Egyptian Eevival of
garrisons from Najd, the power of the Wahhabis and their influence in JueS^n'the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. affairs began to revive; but their name no longer inspired ^04 33 Gulf '
an almost superstitious terror as formerly, and their policy and aims now
resembled very closely those of ordinary mundane states. In 1825 the
Shaikh of Sharjah professed to be seriously alarmed by the progress of
the Wahhabis and sought British support; but it was not until 1880,
when, after a contest with the Bam Khalid lasting about six years, the
Wahhabis recovered possession of Hasa, that they became once more an
important factor in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . At the end of 1830 a threatened
combination between them and the Sultan of ; Oman so alarmed the
Shaikhs of Bahrain that, after vainly soliciting help from the British
Government, they made submission to the Wahhabi Amir and undertook
to pay him tribute in future; and there was much excitement upon the
Pirate Coast, where the Shaikhs of 'Ajman and Umm-al-Qaiwain openly
professed themselves partisans of the Wahhabis, but these latter did not
make any immediate attempt to profit by the situation. Friendly ad
vances, which reflected his moderate and civilised character, were made by
the Wahhabi Amir Tnrki-bin-' , Abdullah to the Bombay Government in
1831; and, though no treaty was concluded in accordance with his sug
gestions, he did not fail to receive a courteous answer to his communica
tion. In 1883 the Sultan of 'Oman, having failed to enlist the active
co-operation of the British in resisting the encroachments of the Wahhabis
upon his dominions, followed the example of the Bahrain ShaiKhs by be
coming tributary to the Wahhabi Amir, with whom he also entered into
a compact for mutual aid against rebellious subjects; and in 1834 the
Wahhabi representative at Baraimi interfered in a struggle which was
in progress between the Shaikhs of Sharjah and Abu Dhabi, the two

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎207] (350/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000097> [accessed 14 August 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000097">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;207] (350/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000097">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0350.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image