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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎208] (351/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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208
Difficulty be
tween the
Sultan of
'Oman and
the Paslia of
Baghdad,
1825-26,
Application
by the Pasha
of Bairhdad
to the British
authorities
for military
assistance,
1827-28.
Disturbance
in the
Persian
Coast, insults
leading chiefs of the Pirate Coast. Simultaneously, however, there was
a decrease of Wahhabi prestige in' the direction of Bahrain, the Shaikh
of which principality in 1833 repudiated his allegiance to the Wahhabi
Amir and in J 834 wrested from him the island of Tarut and blockaded
the ports of the Hasa coast.
At the beginning of the period of Wahhabi revival, a difficulty occurred
between the Sultan of 'Oman and the Pasha of Baghdad : the cause was
a subsidy, claimed by the Sultan as having been granted to his grand
father for helping the Turks to defend Basrah against the Persians in
1775-76, which was withheld by the Pasha. A naval blockade of Basrah,
contemplated in 1825, was actually enforced by Saiyid Sa'id in 1826;
and the Pasha, who had at first denied the claim, and who bad refused
British mediation, found himself obliged to comply with the ; 0mani
ruler s demands and to pay up considerable arrears of the subsidy which
were due.
In lb27 the Pasha of Baghdad, having been directed by the Porte
(in consequence of the danger to the Turkish Empire from Russia) to
organise an efficient army in Turkish 'Iraq, had recourse to the British
authorities in India, from whom he requested help in the form of a
loan of Hritish officers and non-commissioned officers to act as instructors
and as superintendents of technical departments, a supply of arms and
military stores, and three war vessels of considerable size. The conditions
\\ Inch he proposed were such that the Government of India would not, if
they complied, be involved in any expense. The application of the Pasha
was strongly supported by the Government of Bombay, but it was rejected
by the Government of India, partly on the ground of unsatisfactory
relations which they supposed to exist between the British Government
and the Porte,—a decision greatly regretted by the Court of
Directors of the East India Company, who thought that the opportunity,
except in so far as the Pasha's request related to naval matters, ou^ht
certainly not to have heen neglected The advantages which they con
sidered had been foregone by the refusal of the Government of
India were the establishment of British influence in Turkish 'Iraq and
the acquisition of a coign of vantage from which the proceedings of
Russia in the Middle East might have been carefully watched.
The Pasha did not, as the Directors hoped that he might, renew his
proposals.
While the Wahhabis were endeavouring to re-establish their position
upon the western coasts of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , the Persian government,
avoured by hostilities between the Sultan of 'Oman and the ruling Arab

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎208] (351/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x000098> [accessed 20 August 2018]

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