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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎210] (353/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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210
Attack by the
Sultan of
'Oman upon
Baliraiu anil
resulting
disturbances
at sea in the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. .
1828-29.
Rebellion in
Qatar
against the
authority of
the Shaikh
of Bahrain,
1835.
The first
Maritime
Truce, 1835,
and lleBtric-
In the autumn of 1828 the Sultan of 'Oman, unassisted on this occasion
oithor by the Wahhabis or by the Persians, but accompanied by a conting
ent of Bani Yas from A.bu Dhabi, made a serious attempt to reduce the
Shaikhs of Bahrain, who had long since repudiated the position of depend
ence on Masqat accepted by them iu ISiJO. The Al Khalifah, however,
presented a firm front to Saiyid Sard's attack and repulsed it with a loss to
the invaders, among- whom the Bani Yas were afterwards alleged to have
acted treacherously towards their allies, of two vessels and about
500 men.
The extent to which the powers of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. now depended
upon British protection against one another in maritime matters was
illustrated by a complaint which the senior Shaikh of Bahrain, as a party
to the General Treaty of Peace, immediately brought against the Shaikh
of Abu Dhabi, who was also a signatory, in respect of the Sultan of
'Oman's descent upon Bahrain. He was informed in reply that the incid
ent must be regarded as one of legitimate warfare and therefore as not com
ing within the scope of the Treaty ; and the result was the equipment by
him of a fleet for the purpose of making reprisals upon the Sultan of 'Oman.
As was common in such circumstances, whether from excitement or through
mistake, actions practically indistinguishable from piracy followed, the
principal being the plundering and sinking of a neutral Murbat vessel by
the 'Atbi squadron; and it became necessary for the Resident to enforce,
by means of armed demonstration, the payment of partial compensation by
the Shaikh of Bahrain to the sufferers in the case of the Murbat vessel.
In 1829, not without pressure applied to the Shaikhs of Bahrain by the
British Resident, a reconciliation took place between them and the Sultan
of 'Oman, of which a principal condition was the recognition by Saiyid
Sa'id of the independence of Bahrain.
Another event by which the security of the Gulf was considerably
endangered occurred in 1835, when the people of Huwailah in Qatar, then
a dependency of Bahrain, rebelled and joined with some disaffected mem
bers of the Bahrain ruling family and a number of Wahhabi subjects m
committing maritime irregularities. The immediate consequence was the
secession of a body of Al Bin -"Ali and Al Bii 'Ainain tribesmen, under a
daring and energetic leader named 'Isa-bin-Tarif, to Abu Dhabi
where they came for the time being, under the restrictions of the General
Treaty of Peace.
Ihe General Treaty of Peace of 1820, while it prohibited "plunder
and piracy'"' at sea, was no bar to regular naval hostilities and it was

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎210] (353/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00009a> [accessed 20 February 2018]

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