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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎211] (354/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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211
therefore inadequate—in a region where warfare between petty Arab tive Line,
states was frequent, and where, as many examples showed, fighting of 1836 '
any kind was apt to give rise to piratical practices affecting neutrals—to
ensure the maintenance of security at sea in a full and proper degree.
The disadvantages of a system of mutual rapine was quickly perceived by
the more intelligent among the signatories of the Treaty as soon as under
its provisions they began to enjoy, in however limited a degree, the bless
ings of peace; and a desire sprang up, on the part of some of them, for
further restrictions upon the use of force. When maritime war pre
vailed in the summer months, it was apt to disturb, and even to prevent,
those pearl diving operations which were the principal resource of all
the sea-faring Arab tribes; and it was clear that, if hostilities
could be confined to the pearlers-" off-season, the change would
be a notable boon to all, even to the combatants. Accordingly
in 1835, immediately after the final outbreak of piracy among the
Bani Yas, the question was taken up by Captain Hennell, the
Resident at Bushehr; and he ultimately succeeded in arranging a
Maritime Truce, to be observed by the leading Shaikhs of the Pirate
Coast and their subjects, from the 21st May to the 21st November of
that year. The Truce was received with acclamation by all of those
whom it principally concerned. It proved to be the first of a series of
Truces, the enforcement of which, together with that of the General
Treaty against piracy, in the end brought about a state of perfect
maritime security in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; and from the year 1835 the
tract hitherto described as the a Pirate Coast" may legitimately, and
even more appropriately, be referred to as " Trucial 'Oman."
In 1836 an additional limitation was imposed by the British authorities,
without treaty, upon hostile operations at sea, which the Arab tribes were
required to conduct for the future, at such times as no Truce existed, exclu
sively in certain defined waters adjoining their own coasts. Notwithstand
ing an opinion expressed by the Court of Directors of the East India
Company so lately as 1831, that it could be inexpedient to assume that
general protectorate over the Arab tribes " which would be implied in
our prohibiting wars and becoming the arbitrators of all their disputes/ - '
the chiefs adhering to the Truce were given to understand that infringe
ments of the same should be reported to the British political authorities,
by whom they would be punished in the same manner as acts of piracy
had hitherto been ; but the success of the measure justified the departure,
if such it were, from the established policy of the Company.
23 a

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎211] (354/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00009b> [accessed 22 May 2018]

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