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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎214] (357/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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214
Absorption of
the Masqat
Resideocy
into tiiat of
BCshehr, and
of the
Baghdad
Kesidency
Jnto tliat of
Basrah.
'J'be question of a reduction of the British political establishments
in the Gulf came under consideration in 1809-10 in consequence of
the cessation of danger from France ; and it was resolved by the Govern
ment of India that their political representation in the Gulf region
should ultimately, if it were found possible, be concentrated in one
Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. ; but the desired reduction was obviously too considerable,
notwithstanding the supposed extirpation of piracy by the late expedition
against the Qawasim, to be effected all at once. In January 1810
General Malcolm, then starting on his third mission to Persia, recom
mended that the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. at Masqat should be abolished, the representa
tion of British interest in the 'Oman Sultanate and on the Arab coast
generally being entrusted thereafter to the Resident at Bushehr, who
should be furnished with such assistance as would enable him to under
take the work thus imposed on him in addition to his former duties.
The suggestion seems to have been accepted at once by the Government
of India; and Mr. Hankey Smith, Resident at Bushehr, who accom
panied General Malcolm on the voyage from Bombay to the Gulf, was
ordered to take Masqat under his charge and was provided with two
Assistants, Messrs. Babington and Williams of the Civil Service, in
addition to his existing Assistant (Lieutenant Bruce) at Bushehr; but he
was not employed, as had been proposed by General Malcolm, to nego
tiate with the Arab tribes on the conclusion of the anti-piratical expedi
tion then in progress, the reason, however, probably being that the
necessity for a regular settlement with the tribes was not as yet properly
appreciated. On the 1st May 1810 Mr. H, Smith informed the Govern
ment of Bombay that " the pernicious effect of the climate of Maskat
obliged him to resign all further charge of the duties of that station,^ at
which it may perhaps be inferred—he had b^en instructed to reside;
but Government, in permitting him to relinquish it, directed his Assist
ants Messrs. Babington and Williams to remain at Bushehr, and exhor
ted them to qualify themselves..." for future employment in the Gulph by
acquiring a thorough and practical knowledge both of Persian and
-n-iaoic, Meanwhile search was to be made for a station more healthy
than Masqat from which the affairs of ^Oman might be supervised. The
hoiror in which Masqat was held at this time by the East India Com
pany s servants is not difficult to understand if it is remembered that the
cbmatf had already proved fatal to all the four Residents who had held
office there since the foundation of the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. in 1800. On Mr. H.
Smiths withdrawal to Bushehr, where he remained as Resident for
'it a yeai longei, British concerns in 'Oman were probably left to the
care of a Native Agent Non-British agents affiliated with the British Government. , as formerly.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎214] (357/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x00009e> [accessed 20 May 2018]

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