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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎220] (363/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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220
Admiuistm-
tive charges
in 1835.
Marine and
river surveys,
1810-36.
expenditure would be compatible with the occupation of Khara^ there
would be an inevitable increase in the military budget of two lakhs of
rupees annually, exclusive of an initial outlay of one lakh upon buildings
and the cost of periodical repairs to the same. The Kharag scheme,
therefore, was again quietly laid upon the shelf.
The possibility of an amalgamation of the Bushehr and Basrah or
Baghdad appointments, contemplated in 1810 and for a short time
realised, or all but realised, in 1822, had meanwhile been kept in view
and the Civil Finance Committee of 1S30 pronounced in its favour, and
were apparently supported in this, as in the rest of their recommenda-
tions, by the Government of India; but the Court of Directors of the East
India Company, when the general question of administrative reorganisation
in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. finally came before them in 1834, decided that, in view
of the political situation in the Middle East, the abolition of the separate
Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. in Turkish Arabia was for the time being impracticable.
In ] 835, in which year the general charge of British interests in Persia
\\as retransferred from the Indian to the Home Government and Mr, H,
hi lis pioceeded as British Ambassador to Tehran, the British political repre
sentative in Turkish Iraq, who since 1806 had been (with an interval,
perhaps, from 1S08 to 1811) subordinate to the Government of Bombay,
came instead under the direct orders of the Government of India, Such
being already the position of the Resident at Bushehr, all the British estab
lishment maintained in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. were from this date under the
immediate control * of the Government of India. It was proposedin 1835,
to abolish the post of Assistant to the Resident at Bushehr, but the change
was at first postponed and then vetoed.
(t was during the period with which we are now concerned that the first
legular marine survey of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. was made. Charts »f a kind
for the guidance of vessels in the Gulf already existed in 1785, gnd these
Lieutenant John McCluer, a self-taught surveyor of the East Indii Compa
ny s Marine, had devoted himself assiduously to correcting during a period
of three years service in the Gulf, the result of his voluntary laboirs being
a chart of the whole north-eastern side of that sea and of the Shatt-al-'Arab
up to Basrah, accompanied by a memoir, besides plans of the harbours of
Masqat, Basrah, and other ports. The south-western or Arabian shores of
the Gulf, however, remained for the most part practically unknowr; aud in
1810,giving the commanders of the British expedition against the Qawasiffi
# Correspondence, however, was apparently sent under flying seal througn the Gov-
pinment of Bombay, tn'rfe page/ 1339, and complete control was not traflsferrrd to
the Government of India nntiimS, vide page 265.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎220] (363/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000a4> [accessed 20 May 2018]

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