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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎223] (366/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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223
The chief cause to which the Russian question, existing in a latent form
since 1828 or even since 1804, owed its appearance in the field of public
fari % debate was probably the accession to the throne of Persia in 1834 of
Muhammad Shah, whose conduct gave the impression of his being subser
vient, or likely to become so, to Russian policy. Fat-h ^Ali Khan, notwith
standing the Treaty of Turkmanchai, resisted successfully to his dying
day the establishment of a permanent Russian Mission at Tehran ; but his
grandson was more compliant. The new Shah, after a Russian Minister had
been definitely established at his Court, seemed to consult him no less freely
and intimately than he did the British representative. It is possible that
the Shah's cousins, the sons of the Farman-Farma of Fars, were counten
anced by the British Government as potential rivals to Muhammad Shah ;
and their reception in England in 1835 probably made an unfavourable
impression on that ruler and contributed to his estrangement from Britain.
The relative strength of British and Russian influence at the Persian
Court and the dissimilar manner in which the designs of the Shah upon
Herat were viewed by the British and Russian representatives at Tehran are
described in the chapter on the history of the Persian Coast and Islands.
Muscovite influence was decidedly in the ascendant, and Russia favoured
the idea of a Persian attack on Herat. That town and its districts were a
part of Afghanistan, but they formed a principality which was politically
detached from the rest of the country, being still governed by a branch of
the Sadozai family; and they seemed not unlikely to go down before a
military effort of even such moderate strength as Persia might be expected
to put forth. If Herat were annexed to Persia, it would come ipso faclo
under Russian influence and might be made the seat of a Russian political
agent for the prosecution of further designs in Afghanistan. If, on the
other hand, Persia failed at Herat, she would be weakened and would fall
more completely into the hands of the foreign power predominant at her
capital. In any case Britain could not but oppose all acts of Persian inter
ference in Afghanistan and must so, of necessity, make herself disagreeable
to the Shah. British influence was as a matter of fact exerted to prevent
the Herat enterprise, though without success ; and British representations
contributed to its abandonment in the end by the Shah, not however until
weight had been lent them by the occupation * of Kharag Island in
* Sir H. Eawlinson {England and Russia'' in the East, p. 59) seems to question the
existence of any real connection between the British occupation of Kharag and the Persian
withdrawal from Herat; but in this he seems to stand alone among eminent authorities.
There can of course be no doubt that the determined character of the defence of Herat,
inspired by Pottinger, was a more important factor than any other in the failure of the
Persians.
Immediate
cause of a
Russo-
Ikitish crisis
in Persia,
1834-36.
Persian ex
pedition to
Herat and
British occu«
patio n of
Kharag
Island,
1837-38.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎223] (366/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000a7> [accessed 14 August 2018]

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