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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎224] (367/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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Burnes' Mis
sion to Kabul
and First
Afghan War,
1837-42.
224
the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. by a force from India, and perhaps by rumours that a
British invasion of Afghanistan was being prepared.
The development of events on the Afghan (side) had no very direct con
nection with Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. affairs, but it must be mentioned. In 1837
Lieutenant Burnes, afterwards Sir Alexander Burnes, was deputed to Kabul
by Lord Auckland, Governor-General of I ndia, chiefly to negotiate an
understanding with Dost Muhammad Khan, the Barakzai ruler of North-
Eastern Afghanistan. This British Mission, from various causes, failed in
its principal object; while a less formal Russian Mission to Kabul, conduc
ted by one Witkewitch or Vicovitch, who was afterwards disowned by the
Russian Government and committed suicide, achieved an apparent but only
temporary success. Lord Auckland then determined to remove the reigning
Amir of Kabul from power in the interests of Shah Shuja', an ex-ruler of
Afghanistan belonging to the old Sadozai dynasty, who had resided in
India for many years as a political refugee and pensioner of the British
authorities. A British invasion of Afghanistan and the First Afghan War
(1838-42) ensued, resulting in the occupation of Kabul and other points in
the country, and in the surrender and removal to India of Dost Muhammad
Khan. The occupation of K abul, however, ended disastrously, and field
operations were renewed in order to rehabilitate the prestige of the British
arms in the East, an object which they in a considerable degree effected.
The notion of imposing a Sadozai ruler on the Afghan people having been
abandoned, Afghanistan was ultimately evacuated by the British troops
and Dost Muhammad Khan replaced in possession of Kabul and its
dependencies, while Qandahar and its territories continued under the
government of other members of the Barakzai family,—to be annexed,
however, some years later by the ruler of Kabul.
The First Afghan War, which was fought under precarious conditions
across the whole breadth of the then independent states of the Punjab and
Sind, has been condemned as a political blunder * of the first magnitude; and
it is not impossible that, with reflection, some less dangerous and costly
expedient for counteracting Russian intrigue in Afghanistan, on its first
appearance, might have been found. But the principle on which the war
was fought, the exclusion of Russian influence fr om the vicinity of India,
must be admitted to have been sound ; and it might also be argued that the
military experience and political knowledge gained by Britain, to say
folloJed 6 ^ e lh n &ton is said to hare been a sevfre
critic of the policy

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎224] (367/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000a8> [accessed 24 February 2018]

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