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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎228] (371/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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228
The expansion of Egypt, a process initiated in 188!, began in 1839 to
threaten seriously the districts bordering on the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , notwith-
standing an assurance previously given by Muhammad ^Ali to the British
representative at Cairo that his conquests would not take an easterly
direction. In 1838 the Egyptian forces had overrun Najd, installing an
Amir subservient to Egypt; and towards the end of that year, or early in
the next, the maritime province of Hasa and its ports were occupied by
them. An Egyptian political agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. was established at Kuwait, probably
as an outpost in the direction of Turkish 'Iraq ; and the proceedings of the
Egyptian Commander-in-Chief in Najd soon showed that it was his aim
to reduce Bahrain, Trucial 'Oman and the 'Oman Sultanate to dependence
upon Egypt.
The Government of India, aware that the encroachments of Muhammad
; Ali in Western Turkey were regarded unfavourably by Her Majesty s
Government, at once took steps through the Naval Commander-in-Chief in
the East Indies and the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. to frustrate
the Egyptian designs in the Gulf. The defence of the Bahrain Islands
by a British naval force was authorised ; the Shaikhs and tribes of Trucial
'Oman were encouraged to combine against the intruders, a British officer
even visiting Baraimi to infuse courage into the Na'im of that place,
whose attitude of all the tribes was the most decidedly hostile to the
Egyptians; and an alliance was promoted, with a view to resisting
Egyptian aggression, between the Saiyid of 'Oman and his relative the
ruler of Sohar. Certain local chiefs, however, among whom the Shaikhs
of Bahrain and Abu Dhabi were conspicuous, showed a disposition to
submit to the Egyptians, whom they imagined to be irresistible because
they had defeated the Wahhabis; and the Shaikh of Bahrain even
entered into a secret agreement with the Egyptian Commander-in-Chief
and became a tributary of the Cairo Government.
In the spring of 1840 a British blockade of the Hasa coast was about
to be enforced, when the Egyptians, alarmed by the prospect of coercion
at the hands of Britain and other European powers in the Mediterranean,
suddenly evacuated Hasa and Najd. The excitement which their
restlessness had caused in Eastern Arabia then at once died away.
The accumulation of difficulties caused in 1839-40 by uncertain
relations with Russia, a great war in Afghanistan, a diplomatic crisis in
Persia, and Egyptian aggression in Syria and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , must have
been embarrassing to the British Government; and it cannot but be
admitted that they confronted the situation with energy and success.
After the Egyptians had retired, their policy of dictation towaids
neighbouring Arab principalities in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. was resumed by the

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎228] (371/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000ac> [accessed 24 February 2018]

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