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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎231] (374/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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231
a small demonsfcration by British armed vessels in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and
Shatt-al-'Arab at the beginning of 1854 availed to keep peace unbroken
between the two Muhammadan powers. Among the European nations
engaged in the Crimean struggle war continued until 1856.
Meanwhile, chiefly ia consequence of a revived ambition on the part of The Herat
Persia to annex Herat,—an ambition the realisation of which was still l^stwn and
regarded by British statesmen as likely to be injurious to British Indian tes between
interests, the relations of the British and Persian Governments were Per^ aU<i
deteriorating. In 1852 Persia occupied Herat; but in 1853 she was 1852-56.
induced by Britain, not without difficulty, to sign an Agreement relinquish
ing Herat and undertaking not to interfere with it in future.
In 1854-55 the conduct of the Persian Government towards the
British Minister at Tehran.perhaps in consequence of an idea that Britain
was too much hampered ly the Crimean war to resent it, was extremely
insulting; and at the end cf 1855 the British diplomatic representative
was withdrawn from P;rsia. In 1856, presuming probably on the
absence of the British Mission and on the supposed difficulties of Britain
in Europe, the Persians again occupied Herat.
A short but decisive war followed, in which Persia was quickly Anglo-Per-
beaten to her knees. Ihe attitude of the Turks, who perhaps hoped ^ian TVar^and
that :one result mignt be the transfer of Muhammareh to themselves. Peace, 1856-
was neutral, but berevolent towards Britain; and it was noticed that the 67 '
issue of the operations had a salutary effect in Turkish 'Iraq, where it
inspired additional respect for the British name. The war was ended
by a Treaty by which Persia recognised the independence of Afghanistan,
and in particular of the iierat province, and bound herself to submit
any future differences which she might have with the ruler of Herat
to British mediation. All other questions pending between the British
and Persian Governments were settled also, in principle or in detail, by
the Treaty.
At this point occurred the great Indian Mutiny of 1857-58; but, The Indiaii
except in a very rapid withdrawal of the Persian Pield Force to India Mutiny,
1857-58
after its work was done, no effect of the M utiny was perceptible in the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. .
French activity in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region, 1836-61.
The only European power besides Britain and Russia which during
thie period displayed any interest in the countries of the Persian
Gulf was France, and her activity was superficial and mostly confined
to the years 1839-48.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎231] (374/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000af> [accessed 23 February 2018]

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