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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎249] (392/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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249
that they cannot have supplied the defidcn--« -V regard to local infer-
mation of a marine character.
The crisis at Masqat in 1866 illustrated the dangers inseparable from
the want of a local naval force. Had the " Berenice," a ship it would seem
of the Bombay Marine The navy of the East India Company. , not been at hand, it migl^ Lev- ;:cn impossible to
provide in time for the safety of British subjects ; jor ic '..'as not until the
' Berenice " with the refugees aboard her had reached Khor-ash-Sham that
H.M.SS. " Highflyer " and "Octavia^ appeared at Masqat. It being
contrary to the orders of the Admiralty to employ Royal Navy vessels as
guardships for telegraph stations, the <c Clyde ^ and c ' Hugh Rose " of the
Bombay Marine The navy of the East India Company. were stationed at Gwadur and Khor-ash-Sham to afford
protection required in consequence of the revolution in 'Oman.
A little later in the same year H.M.S. Pantaloon " was compelled to
leave the Gulf suddenly, as a demand for her services had arisen on the
coast of East Africa ,• and the progress of peace negotiations with the
Wahhabis and the investigation of numerous maritime irregularities
that had occurred were both perforce interrupted.
These occurrences drew from the Resident, in correspondence with the
Government of Bombay, the following observations :
The Tfaj to piovide for the maritime police of the Gulf ia to have an armed vessol al?
the disposal of your representative in the Gulf-such vessel to be adapted for coasting
work, to be efficiently armed and manned from England, and to he under the ordsrs of
the Indian Government. Her Majesty's troops come out to India for long terms, and
serve under the Indian Government; work would he much facilitated if the same rule
obtained in regard to Her Majesty s ships of war. If this cannot be, then the next best
thing might, peihaps, be to htne an Indian Naval Staff Corps serving aboard vessels
built for the Indian Government, but built in England with all the modern fittings and
improvements of the English Dockyard.
The great disturbance of the peace Avhich occurred on the coast of 1867-68
Qatar in October 1867 exhibited the deficiencies of the new naval system,
or want of system, in a glaring light. Except the Bombay Marine The navy of the East India Company. gun
boat " Hugh Rose/' which could only steam for eight hours at a time and
was manned entirely by natives of India, the first vessel to become avail
able was the " Sind/ ; also of the Bombay Marine The navy of the East India Company. , which arrived on the
spot in an inefficient condition in May 1868; and in the following month
there were symptoms of a renewal of trouble on a large scale. Only at the
end of July or beginning of August 1868 did H.M.S. " Vigilant " reach
the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and make possible those punitive and repressive operations
which ought to have been undertaken many months earlier,

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎249] (392/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000c1> [accessed 19 October 2018]

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