Skip to item: of 1,782

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎254] (397/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

254
of tlio Gulf for the following reasons :—thai the colliers would thereby be saved He
risk, delay, and cost of working up the Gulf agaixst its prevailing wind, a nor-wester;
that coal taken in at the mouth of the Gulf would be sufficient in every steamer (even
when well laded) to run her up to her extreme possible terminus of Busreb or Koornab
and back ; that the entrance of the Gulf is the point first reached by a steamer comins;
in from a distant port, and liable therefore to be short of coal ; that the entrance of
the Gulf is conveniently situate half way between Western India and Busreh ; that the
great difficulty ship-! coming to the Gulf trade experience, is not arrival at the entrance,
but the sailing up and down it ; and that, consequently, it may be expected that, as
trade developes, it might become convenient for it to be carried by sailing craft to C»pe
Mussundoom, and thence to ^be distributed round the Gulf, and up the Tigris line by
steamers, which, in like manner, would collect goods along the Gulf shores, and bring
them to the central entrepot at Mussundoom.
12. That even {sic) political consideration, Persian territory is not so convenient for
our purposes of a Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. , a Telegraph Station, a Coal Depot, and a free port of trade,
as might be some other point in the Gulf. The Persians have some good qualities, but they
are jealous and small-minded beyond any people I ever came across in the coarse of my
twenty-two years travel. Almost any Government in the world affords privileges of
wholesome lodging to foreign representatives, but what is the fact at Bushire? They
would not allow the Resident to build a house, although such a house was essential to
his health ! When the question was referred to England, the Resident was reluctantly
allowed to build a house of the dimensions of his tent ! The Physician in charge of the
Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. venturing to do the same, his house was pulled down by the order of the
Persian Government, and in contempt of the Resident. I give these facts simply in
illustration of our political relations with Persia, after forty years' diplomacy and great
expenditure. The simple truth is, if I may be allowed to judge from ray experience in
the Legation at Tehran, and here in the Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. , there will never be real political
confidence on the part of Persia towards England, so long as we attack her when she
aggi esses eastward, and so long as we decline a defensive treaty with her to the westward.
So situate, our relations with Persia may be disturbed suddenly and overawed by Russia,
or from her own jealous temperament, Persia might interrupt our eastern communication
via the Gulf in her jurisdiction, before force < r diplomacy could intervene to save them.
13. That at the present moment, and while all our relations with the Gulf are nnder
consideration, it would perhaps, be worthy the time of Government to solve permanently,
the following problem ;—To 6nd a point somewhere in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. which shall offei
following advantages ; —
Ist. — Centrality, aa a free port, where trade may concentrate, where re-shipment
may take place, and where goods transhipped may be most conveniently
distributed.
2nd.—Which shall possess centrality as a telegraphic station, and most readily affoid
means of maintaining on either hand communication by steamer in the event
of accident to the cable.
^rd. Which should be the most central and convenient point for a Coal Depit.
4th. W hich should be the most dominating point for keeping the sea police aiong
the Pirate Coast, and for settling or preventing quarrels among the nwitimc
Arabs with the least possible delay, with the minimum cost of an ^
without taking the Resident to any great distance from his Head Quaiters.
5th.—Which should enable the Resident of the Gulf to manage, without embai
rassment, the relations in^the {sic) Muscat as well as those in the Gulf, fort e
territories of Muscat are so mixed up with those of Persia and the Arabs, and its
political relations are so interwoven with the politics of the Gulf, that it woul

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎254] (397/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000c6> [accessed 21 May 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000c6">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;254] (397/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000c6">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0397.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image