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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎256] (399/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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256
Jjettcr No. 2-A, dated ht February 1363.
In a memorandum appended to my letter No. 1-A, of the 13th January 1,863,1
suggested the concentration of this Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. , Main Telegraph Station, and
Coal Dep6t at some spot near Cape Mussundoom, where a free port and depot might be
developed at a point central between tlie Slave Channel at the eutran e of the Gulf and
the Pirate coast.
2. Some of the principal arguments recurring to mo in favour of the scheme were
summed up in the memorandum itself. And subsequent reflection tends to strengthen
my conviction that it is poBsible for Government to create, supposing climate to be
sufficiently bearable, near CapeMussundoom, a settlement which, from its geographical
position, under a free rule, would, before many years elapse, become of considerable
importance, and lend to our interest and to our status, whether commercial or political,
in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. a character and a developement which they do not at present possess,
and which, perhaps, they would not readily attain unless under some arrangement such
as that'proposed.
3. I believe that in a settlement of the nature suggested would be found the best
means practicable for preventing slaves entering the Gulf; of preventing piracy and
disturbance in the Gulf itself; of civilizing the maritime Arabs; of extending a
healthful influence into Arabia on the one hand, and into Western Mekran on the
other ; of offering to many Indians and other merchants now scattered round the shores
of the Gulf an unmolested refuge for the free prosecution of commerce ; and finally, of
giving to the ports of the Gulf, in general, an impetus and an example which it might
be expected, would in the end induce or compel the Governments of these ports eitliei
to imitate our system or risk the loss of their trade.
4. If Government should approve the proposal, among matters of detail to come
under consideration would be the following :—
1st.—A clear and valid written title should be obtained from the Sultan of Muscat
for the land ; and the conduct of this preliminary measure should, I think, be entrusted
to cool and 1 experienced hands : so conducted it would probably be easily arranged. But
if any eccentrity were committed in this part of the business, much delay might ensue.
2nd.—The neighbourhood of Mussundoom should be carefully examined, in view
to selecting a spot suitable to the objects we have in view, in respect of water, extent ot
ground, non-command of position, calm and land -locked harbourage, etc.
3rd.—The ground should be laid out with forethought, to meet possible distant
future requirements ; the public stores and offices should be as compact as possible, aii
their site uncommanded whether by land or sea. Cuttings or seeds from trees foun
indigenous in the neighbourhood should, without loss of time, be planted along 1
proposed roads and in groups near the watering places and landing points. Emancipa e
slaves, at present agented by a 30 Rupees moonshee at Bassidore, might aid in h
public works as free men.
t 4 Jrl
4th,—The old scantling of our camp houses at Bushire, still available 1 ain
at Bombay, might be sent up for use.
5th.— Moving buoys should be laid down in the anchorage for the general conven '
ence of shipping ; the moorings for Her Majesty's ships being a little apart fi |)in
others.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎256] (399/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575942.0x0000c8> [accessed 23 February 2018]

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