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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎260] (403/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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etand, very favourably on the productive powers and facilities for trade of the regiomit
the head of the Gulf.
12. There is in prospect, also, the opening of some line, whether of rail entire, or of
rail combined with river and canal communication, between the head of the Gulf and
the Mediterranean, and I have recently had an interesting convemtion on this subject
with the Turkish Director of Public Works in the Pashalik of Baghdad.
13. No one who has observed and studied the development of trade and progress and
®f political events since the time when i first served in Sindhin 1841, can be blind to
the great potential importance of the line connecting Kurrachee with Europe via not
the so-ealled Euphrates line without deviation, but vta some line connecting the Persian
Gulf with the Mediterranean by the Tigris or Euphrates, or by canals, or by one or other,
or by all of these combined, with connecting intervals of rail.
14. I forbear troubling Govemment with statistical statements, because I know
how figures mislead, unless they are based on reliable accounts, and such are not at
present available in these regions for the general trade.
15. But the constant increase in the number of steamers, the comparative small
falling-off in native craft, the contentment of the merchants, the increased rate of mule
hire, the increasing number of solid houses at the ports, and the inconvenient rise in
house-rent and general prices, while they do not constitute statistical statements, are
yet facts which could not, perhaps, exist, unless the statistics of trade were favourable,
whether tabulated or not.
16. On the other hand,' it should never be forgotten that this line is, perhaps,
singular in one respect, viz., that while, on the one hand, civilization and trade are in
creasing more than we could have expected, we have, on the other hand, constantly to
watch on the Arab littoral tribes who have immemorially been accustomed to dwell in i
condition wherein every man's hand was ever prone to be raised against his neighbour.
To keep the maritime peace along the strongholds of these littoral Chieftainships isuc
child's play. It is not alone by the sudden and occasional appearance of a man-of-war
that this can be thoroughly done. What is required is uniform vigilance and pressure.
The position of the Resident as arbitrator of the maritime truce may be aptly compareJ
with that of an officer holdingla civilized frontier against lawless borderers. Those bord
erers would never be kept quiet or reduced to order and industry by intermittent
sallies from a garrison, accompanied by|tardy retaliation ; what is wanted is the conitant
pressure of watchful outposts ready at any moment to put down raids, and uphold tfif
peaceful and well inclined. The tribes so dealt with gradually come to perceive thatt e
object of the civilized Power'in patrolling is not vengeance, but the general good at
the maintenance of peace and progress. The tribes thus come to learn also that rai ^
and piracy are unsuccessful in practice. Our light gun-boats are such outpostb an
patrols for the Arab coast; and my respectful and earnest recommendation to the I
Honourable the Governor in Council is to keep the small sea force available for «
Gulfs of 'Oman and Persia under one head, and to permit that head to patrol, e •
or concentrate it as he may deem the necessities of the moment to dictate. The tee^
graph runs through these regions, thus giving the Resident instant intellig® 11 ^
whatever happens; although, as a rule, the littorals of Mekran and Muscat are entiK
peaceful, and it is only along the A.rab Coast of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , between ap
Mussendoom and Koweit, that the maritime Arabs require habitual watching. ^
that I could write on the principle involved in this agreement {tic) ma y ^ „
better expressed in the writings of the General who first taught to meditate
problems. I allude to thosa of the late Colonel John Jacob.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎260] (403/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000004> [accessed 21 May 2018]

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