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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎266] (409/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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266
succeeded each other with great rapidity, and in all of them the march of events lias been
such as to demand a prompt decision on questions of the greatest international importanoe.
We have, indeed, repeatedly found ourselves salled'on, iu matters which had apparently
been long settled, to consider questions involving the past, present, and future policy of
Government, to decide rapidly, and to act promptly.
Nearly all of these questions have been of a purely imperial character, such as no
authority bat the highest in India could venture to decide. Some of the most mo
mentous of them have arisen from the attitude assumed towards neighbouring Powers by
the Governments of Turkey and Persia in matters closely affecting the [most important
interests of the British Empire. They have involved correspondence ;with Foreign
Powers, judgments on the acts and policy of nations represented in the Councils of
Europe, and action in important international affairs, which no local Government has
either the knowledge of or the intluence to enable them to control, and the settlement of
which, even if they had, could not, consistently with what is due to powerful indepen
dent nations, be left in the hands of any authority subordinate to Her Majesty's
Government of India.
In former years, when steam communication was in its infancy and^telegraphs were
unknown, it may have been thought desirable to leave a larger voice in these questions
to the subordinate authorities, with whom communication with those countries could bo
most rapidly and regularly maintained. But such necessity has long passed away.
There is no part of the countries "referred to which cannot be communicated with as
quickly through the telegraph, and nearly as quickly through the post, by the Gov
ernment of India as by the Government of Bombay. The reasons for the [exceptional
course hitherto followed have therefore ceased, and the control of purely political relations
with Foreign Independent Powers ought consequently to revert to the authority to which
they properly belong, and by which alone they can be conducted with safety and
advantage to the interests of the Empire, Indeed, the necessity for this change has
been so strongly felt of late, that when matter's of extraordinary importauceor urgency
have arisen—such, for instance, as the Turkish expedition to Nejd~we have not
hesitated to communicate instmctions direct to the Representative of the British
Government on the spot, sending a copy to the Government of Bombay for their inform
ation. But even on such occasions—still more of course, on other occasions, when the
entire correspondence, telegraphic or other, is conducted through the medium of the Local
Government we find that a speedy and full comprehension, by the local British Agents,
of the line of policy which the Government of India desires to pursue, and the receipt
of timely information by ourselves of the state of affairs, are seriously impeded by the
interposition of a local Government.
A number of particular cases were cited in the Government of India s
despatch to illustrate the inconveniences which they held to bo inseparable
from the interposition of the Government of Bombay between themselves
and the British political officers in the countries in question.
Later in the year ; a personal change having meanwhile taken place )"
the Governorship of Bombay and no reply having as yet been received
from Her Majesty's Government^ the Government iOf Bombay of theii
own accord proposed that the control of the Political Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. ir 1
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and the Political Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. in Zanzibar should be transfes'
from them to the Government of India in the Foreign Department, o.* 1
such information as they might find of value or urgent importance being

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎266] (409/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x00000a> [accessed 22 May 2018]

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