Skip to item: of 1,782

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎273] (416/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

27
2O4
273
Russia and Turkey by which the position of the latter power was greatly
weakened, but which did not otherwise much affect the position in the
Middle East. On the death in 1863 of Dost Muhammad Khan of Kabul,
the consolidator of Afghanistan, the provinces of Herat and Qandahar
again broke away from the central Afghan government ; and five years
elapsed before Sher 'Ah Khan, the sou and successor of Dost Muhammad
Khan, succeeded with British support in re-incorporating them with his
dominions. Meanwhile the frontiers of Russia in Central Asia we^e being
rapidly pushed forward, and at length a political correspondence between
Tashkend and Kabul came into existence.
On a breach occurring in 1878 between Britain and the Afghan Amir,
consequent on the refusal of the latter to receive a Mission from the Gov
ernment of India headed by Colonel Sir Lewis Pelly, formerly Resident in
the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ^ the Second Afghan War began. It lasted from 1878
to 1879. Sher Ali Khan, having fled to the northern part of his dominions,
died at Mazar-i-Sharif in February 1879; his son Ya'qub Khan was
installed in his place under the Treaty of Gandamak (May 1879) ; and a
British Envoy was established at Kabul in the person of Sir Louis
Cavagnari. This ^<m-appropriation of Kabul by the British Government
ended, like the more pronounced occupation of 1839-41, in a massacre of the
British representative, his suite and escort. The Third Afghan War
followed, with the result that Ya'qub Khan became a political detenu in
India, while Kabul and Qandahar were placed temporarily under British
administration.
And the end of the Second Afghan War the policy of the Government of Th . ^
India was still to maintain the unity of Afghanistan; but the Third Afghan Afghan War,
War caused them to change their views and to recommend instead a dis- and conte ™-
integration of the troublesome Afghan state. The transfer of Herat and membermeut
Sistan to Persia was contemplated, and negotiations with the Shah for the w Af ^Q«Q"
cession or the tormer to Persia on certain stringent conditions even reached 80.
an advanced stage. In 1880, Herat being still held by Ayub Khan, a son
of the late Amir Sher ''Ali Khan, Qandahar was detached from Kabul by
the British and conferred on a Sardar of the Barakzai family; and the
question of constructing a railway from Qandahar to Herat and of affording
financial aid to Persiawere mooted. Ultimately, however, before any
irreversible step had been taken, British policy in Afghanistan reverted
to lines more in accordance with the traditions of the past; and by the end
of 1881 'Abdur Rahman, who had been installed as Amir under an agree
ment which subjected him to British political suzerainty, was master of
Qandahar and Herat as well as of the rest of Afghanistan.
The Second
Afghan War,
1878-80.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎273] (416/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000011> [accessed 22 February 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000011">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;273] (416/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000011">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0416.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image