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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎287] (430/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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287
without importance xn the Persian Gulfj though not directly affecting it; Zanzibar
this was the transfer of British interests and relations in Zanzibar frotn Gover^meat
the care of the Govermnent of India to that of Her Majesty's Groverntnent. of India to
The origin of the Government of India's control over British affairs in Majesty 's
Zanzibar is to be traced in the facts that Zanzibar was at first a dependency Government,
ot the Sultanate of Oman, with which that Government were in relations^
and that the last ruler of the undivided state of 'Oman-ew^-Zanzibar had
his headquarters in Zanzibar. A certain degree of connection between
Zanzibar, Aden, and the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. always existed; and in 1881 the
Government of India expressly permitted its representatives in all three
places to furnish each other with copies of such letters on matters of common
interest as they might address to superior authority in India, provided
that the letters were not of a peculiarly confidential nature.
But, though the trade of Zanzibar was largely in British Indian hands,
the mercantile Indian community settled in large numbers in Zanzibar and
on the East African coast was of older standing than the British Political
Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. in Zanzibar ; and the principal question of importance in Zanzibar,
on which many other questions depended, was that of the slave trade, which
was an Imperial and in no sense a specially Indian concern. Sir Bartle
Frere, in 1873 or 1874, severely criticised what he described as " the
" inherent vice of the present arrangement, which is, that the Government
" of India is called on to control affairs and deal with questions which very
a remotely concern any one east of Aden. "
The Government of India had been for some years disposed to relinquish
control of the British establishments in Zanzibar; and in 1882, when the
cost of I'epresentation there and of the subsidy payable by the Sultan of
Zanzibar to the Sultan of Masqat, which last in the course of negotiation
concerning the repression of the slave trade had become a charge on the
British authorities, was borne in equal moieties by the Home and Indian
Treasuries, the Foreign Office in London proposed a scheme of transfer. It
was, in outline, that the Imperial Government should assume the patronage,
control and payment of the Zanzibar establishment, with its incidental costs
and pension liabilities i i consideration of the Indian Government's making
itself responsible for the payment of the subsidy, so long as the subsidy
should continue to be payable. The proposals of the Foreign Office did
not commend themselves, in this shape, to the Government of India, who
pointed out that more than half of the Zanzibar expenditure, at the rate
then in force, would be thrown upon themselves by the proposed change;
they foresaw, moreover, that the subsidy was not unlikely to be a perpetual
charge, and that, if it should be discontinued, it might be necessary to

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎287] (430/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x00001f> [accessed 21 August 2018]

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