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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎289] (432/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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289
seemingly ill-considered British seheme for a railway from Ahwaz to Tehran
w 1C « as put forward m 1887, was the extortion by Russia from the Shah
m the same year of a promise that he would eonsult the Tsar before permit-
111 t COmpany 40 constract a railway or water-way in Persia,
In 1888 British diplomacy at last triumphed ovei fiussianlopposition and
o er obstacles to the extent of obtaining, after many years of patient effort,
e opening of the lower Karun River to general navigation. Prospects
were at the same time held out by the Persian Government of an arrange
ment for tie construction of a road for wheeled traffic being made without
delay to connect the head of navigation on the Karun with the Persian
capital.
Certain measures of administrative reorganisation taken by the Shah's
Governmentin Southern Persia about this time were not devoid of practical
significance. So early as 1882 a transference had begun to take place of
ports and districts on the Persian coast from the jurisdiction of the Gover
nor-General of Pars to the personal control of the Amin-us-Sultan, a Court
favourite, m 1887 the remainder of Ears was conferred upon the same
official; but simultaneously the most important towns of the littoral were
removed froaa his charge, together with the districts and islands depending
on them, and formed into a new administrative division styled " the Gulf
Ports, ' which was placed under a Governor of its own, in the first instance
a member of the Persian royal family. Probably in the next year, Jashk
and its districts were detached from the Governor-Generalship of Kirman
and included in the Gulf Ports division.
These changes, probably inspired by the Amin-us-Sultan, were accom
panied by an outburst of Persian political activity in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. such
as had never been witnessed there before. In 1887 the Arab port of Lingeh,
hitherto under tribal government, was made subject to direct Persian
administration, and the Persian flag was at the same time hoisted on the
island of Sirri, which had close relations with Lingeh. Persian encroach
ments and intrigues in various directions followed. The withdrawal of the
British military detachment at the Jashk telegraph station was requested
and obtained, but not until the immunities of the station and staff had been
recorded in a formal Agreement between the British and Persian Govern
ments. Official support of false allegations against the British political
representatives at Bushehr and Lingeh and vexatious and insulting proceed
ings in the Bushehr custom house seemed to form part of a set policy for
the reduction of British prestige, but were checked by ..sharp diplomatic
remonstrances at Tehran. In 1887-88 efforts were made to induce the
Shaikhs of Trucial 'Oman to place themselves under the suzerainty of Persia,
28
Opening of
the lower
Karun River
to navigation,
1888.
Formation of
the Persian
Governorship
of the Gulf
Ports, 1887,
Activity and
intrigues of
Persia in the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ,
1887-88.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎289] (432/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000021> [accessed 20 February 2018]

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