Skip to item: of 1,782
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎294] (437/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

294
additional element of uncertainty seems also to have been imported into tte
calculations by an at first imperfect understanding on the point whether the
" Lawrence " was to be armed or not. The Government of India were in
the beginning of opinion that five vessels of the Royal Navy, besides the
new political despatch vessel, would be required for performing the
necessary services ; but other authorities inclined to the view that a smaller
number would suffice.
Eventually in 1887, by which time it had been decided* that the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. despatch vessel should be practically unarmed, though 6tted
for receiving an armament in case of war, when she might, under the
Indian Marine Service Act of 1884, be attached to the Royal Navy, the
Government of India arrived at the conclusion that the number of the Royal
Navy Vessels at their disposal might be reduced to four, of which one should
always be on duty in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and one in reserve at Bombay,
chiefly to meet demands in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. .
This arrangement was accepted by the Admiralty in 1888,'together with
a reduction of the ordinary naval subsidy paid by the Government of India
from £70,000 to £35,500 a year ; but the Government of India were made
responsible for the payment of certain minor charges in addition to the
reduced subsidy, and the whole agreement was treated as provisional in view
of the possibility that newer vessels carrying more expensive complements
might before long be assigned to the East India Station. The practica
result was the substitution in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. of a modern gunboat o
the Royal Navy (the "Sphinx") and a political despatch vessel (the
" Lawrence both steaming 12 knots, for three obsolete naval gun oa s
of the inefficiency and slowness of which there were constant complaints.
A Persian naval force came into existence in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. in 8
with the arrival of the " Persepolis " and u Susa," which had been w
to the order of the Persian Government in Germany. The latter, w ie ^
was a very small craft, was appropriated to service on the Karun Ri \er, an
the possession of the " Persepolis " was of advantage to Persia onl} wi
her own territorial waters.
*Her Majesty's Government ruled that, " should any fighting^be necessary
" times in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , it must be done by Her Majesty s fchips o ffere
Sf there. It would be almost certain to produce complications if the clvl hand
" placed in a position to make war, as it were, from his own yacht. On t 1 ^ 0 f ^eing
" it will be a'Vvontasteous that veswils should be so constructed as to bt c ap a
useful in tiire of war.'

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎294] (437/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000026> [accessed 14 August 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000026">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;294] (437/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000026">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0437.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image