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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎309] (452/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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809
tiaj W ^
France.
Activity of foreign powers other than Britain In the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf.
region, 1894-99.
i
As political paralysis gradually overspread Persia and Turkey there was
a notable increase in the activity of foreign powers besides Britain in the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region, especially France and Russia.
In November 1894 a French Vice-Consulate was established at Mas
qat ; and the function of the new French representative was clearly to
undermine British influence in the Sultanate of ^Oman and to create French
interests which it should be beyond the power of the native ruler to con
trol. The chief means resorted to was the grant of the French flag to
vessels owned by subjects of the Sultan; it was contended by the French
authorities that the possession of the flag placed the vessels to which it
was granted and all persons connected with them under French protection
even as against the Sultan. In 1894 there were more than a score of
Omani vessels flying the French flag, and Sur, the port to which they
belongedj was becoming a focus of French influence. In 1897 the French
\ ice-Consul at Masqat successfully enforced against the Sultan the extreme
rights which he claimed of protecting French flag holders.
In 1895 visits of French war vessels to the Gulf began, the first being
that of the " Troude/' which called at Masqat.
Commercial enterprises were also utilised to push French influence, but
with less considerable results. In 1896 the Messageries Maritimes Com
pany instituted a subsidised steamer service between Bombay and the ports
of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; but, owing to vessels of unsuitable draft being em
ployed, the venture was not a success. In 1898 the French Vice-Consul
at Bushehr visited Muhammareh, and the re-institution of a French sub
sidised line calling at that port, which had been* withdrawn some fifteen
years before, appeared to be contemplated ; but nothing came of the sup
posed project.
In 1895 a monopoly of antiquarian research in Persia was obtained by
France, and under it operations at Shush were renewed in 1897.
Russian proceedings in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and its neighbourhood were R u s 3 i a
still of a tentative character; but their scope was evidently wide. In 1898
an officer of special ability, Mr. Krougloff, was appointed to Baghdad,
where a Russian Consulate, after being abolished in 1886 in favour of
representation through France, had been re-established in 1889. In 1897
a Russian Consul-General was appointed to Isfahan, where Russia had
no material interests.
* See page 283 ante.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎309] (452/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000035> [accessed 21 May 2018]

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