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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎322] (465/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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322
Persian Internal Affairs, 1899-1905.
The decline of Persia under the unworthy Buceessor of Nasir-ud-Din
Shah, proceeded apace. From 1898 to 1903 an able though unscrupulouB
minister virtually ruled the country in the person of the Amin-us-Sultan
or Atabaig-i-A'zam; but his position was precarious from the first, in
consequence of strong political combinations against him; and at length
he was driven into exile by adverse influences at court, religious opposi
tion, and popular discontent. The year of his downfall, 1903, was charac
terised by widespread disorder in Persia, accompanied in places by
massacres of Babis, a sect whose progress the distressed state of the
country seemed to favour. Financial difficulties, attributable largely to
the extravagance of the Shah and his Court, had become the chief bane
of Persian Politics. In'1900, in 1902, and again in 1905, the Shah
visited Europe; and the loans to which his ministers were obliged to
resort reduced Persia to a state of serious indebtedness, mainly to Russia
but partly also to Britain, beginning in the year 1900. Towards the end
of the period doctrines of representative Government began to gain a
footing in Persia and completed, however excellent in themselves, the
disorganisation of the political life of the country.
While most branches of the administration decayed, if decay may be
predicated of things already rotten, the department of Customs, placed
under the management of Belgian officials in 1899, rapidly became more
efficient and successful in its working. Such hopes of the regeneration of
Persia as could reasonably be entertained seemed, indeed, to depend upon
that department. The Persian customs of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , previously
farmed out and execrably mismanaged, began to come under Belgian
control in 1900 ; but the process of transfer was not completed until two
years later. The reform of the customs was not, however, free from
drawbacks. Its execution by foreign agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. , the only manner in which
it was possible, made it unpopular with Persians ; the centralising and
levelling tendencies of the department as re-organised inspired local
officials and hereditary governors, whose authority it curtailed or threat
ened, with fear and distrust of the Tehran Government; and, last but
not least, it furnished fresh subjects of controversy between rival foreign
powers in Persia. The behaviour of the Belgian officials employed was
often arrogant and highhanded ; and the transfer to them of administra
tive functions not properly belonging to customs employes gave some
ground for apprehending that the department might in the end become

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎322] (465/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000042> [accessed 23 February 2018]

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