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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎327] (470/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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Turkish newspaper at Constantinople, announced that [Russia was about
to seize Qishm Island in order to forestall Britain. In August His
I5ritannic Majesty s Minister at lehran reported the existence of reasons
for believing that Russia had acquired, in regard to a port in the Persian
Gulf, certain rights which it might not suit her to enforce immediately;
and in October the Turkish Minister for Foreign Affairs informed the
British Ambassador at Constantinople confidentially that there was ground
to suppose that the Russian Government were negotiating with the
Persian Government for a port in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. to form the terminus
of a trans-Persian Russian railway, or even that the two Governments had
already reached an understanding on the subject. Almost simultaneously
a striking article appeared in the St. Petersburg " Viedomosti,^ edited by
Piince Ukhtomski; it advocated the acquisition of the port of Bandar
Abbas, together with the islands of Qishm, Hanjam, Larak and Hormuz,
in order to provide a terminus for a Russian railway across Persia; and
special reference to the excellent but little-known anchorage off Laft on
the island of Qishm proved that the scheme was based upon good local
information. In this article a scheme for a trans-Persian railway to
Chahbar Bay was also mentioned, but was treated as of secondary impor
tance. The Persian Government strenuously denied the existence of
negotiations between themselves and Russia on the subject of any port in
the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; but later developments, as will be seen, made the
truthfulness of their disclaimer appear very doubtful.
In 1900 the Russian cruiser " Gilyak " visited the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , and
the circumstances of her visit seemed to point to an intention on the part
of the Russian Government to establish a coaling station at Bandar 'Abbas.
This vessel, which was en route to the China station, left Aden for the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. on the 7th February 1900 after a voluminous telegraphic
correspondence between her commander and the Russian Government.
She arrived at Bandar 'Abbas on the 14th February and was joined there
by the a Waddon a British merchant vessel which had been specially
chartered at Suez to carry coal for her to Bandar 'Abbas, and which left
Aden two days after she did. The object of these peculiar arrangements
which might have been obviated by coaling at Bombay or Karachi, can
only be conjectured. The 800 tons of coal brought by the " Waddon "
was more than the a Gilyak " could receive into her bunkers, and, after the
greater part of the surplus had been piled on her deck, a small residue of
about 16 tons remained} this small quantity, insignificant in itself but
sufficient for the foundation of a depdt, the commander of the " Gilyak SJ
would, with the permission of the Persian Deputy. Governor of Bandar

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎327] (470/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000047> [accessed 16 August 2018]

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