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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎337] (480/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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further information showed that the new staff in the Gulf was likely to be
entirely of Russian nationality. In 1903 some Batoum firms sent travellers
to the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and steps were taken for the establishment of museums
of Russian pioducts and manufactures at Bushehr and Basrah. In
Novembei 1903 the Russian Government decided to station a war vessel
permanently in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , and the construction of a gunboat was
subsequently provided for in the Russian naval programme of 1906.
Towards the end of 1904 the Russian Government, in order to assist the
opeiations of the Company, annulled their general prohibition of trade
between Europe and Persia by the Batoum-Baku route in respect of certain
kinds of British merchandise, notably Indian tea, if carried by the Russian
Steam Navigation and Trading Company's steamers from Odessa to
Batoum, and certain reductions of custom duty were granted in favour of
the same articles.
Further aid was rendered to Russian trade in Southern Persia and the
Gulf by the despatch of two Russian commercial missions to those parts in
1904 and 1905, the second under the auspices of the Russian Depart
ment of Mercantile Shipping. The first mission consisted of five members,
and both were headed by Prince Anatouni, a Caucasian Armenian of good
birth. Members of the first mission were seen at ShTraz, Bushehr,
Muhammareh, Shushtar, and other places, the Prince himself visiting the
two last in person in August 1904 ; the chief object then appeared to be the
establishment of Russian Banks at Bushehr and Shiraz. On the second
occasion Prince Anatouni was still described as Secretary of the Russian
Bank/'' but he was also charged with the inspection of the Russian Steam
Navigation and Trading Company's staff, which now consisted of one
senior and seven junior agents stationed at the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ports enu
merated in the Company's prospectus of 1903. This duty cannot have
been very thoroughly performed, for the Prince, who arrived at Bushehr
on the 27th of September 1905 in the Company's steamer "Truvor," left
in the beginning of October for Shiraz, where he remained till the end
of the month, and then departed for Isfahan and Tehran.
Concurrently with the development of the Russian naval, military, and
commercial schemes described above, there were additions to and improve
ments in the consular staff maintained by Russia in the countries adjoin
ing the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . These will be noted in their proper places in
dealing with the detailed political history of the Gulf.
Little political advantage was derived by Russia from the " plague mis
sions " which, as mentioned in the history of the last period, she occasion
ally sent to the shores of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The fact that the sanitary
31
Increased
Russian con
sular re
presentation
in the Per
sian Gulf
region.
Russian sani*
tary agents
and policy in
the Persian
Gulf.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎337] (480/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000051> [accessed 20 February 2018]

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