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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎344] (487/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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JPBRBRMHHBHjMRnMRaRnBBnsnnBHKaiMnnraBaHaR^SRn
T, ■
French com
mercial en
terprises in
the Persian
Gulf.
344
relations with England and submit to the Sultan of Turkey; and a third
had been addressed to Najin-ud-Dln, the ^ Addah Mullah " of Afghanistan
on the part of "all Muhammadans/' which promised support in a war
with England and counselled him to side with Kussia.
Independent confirmation of Salim Qamri's story was also forthcoming,
inasmuch as envelopes containing the " Fath-al-Basair " which had been
seized by the Indian Post Office were identified by Mr. J. Bolton, stationer,
of 39, St. George's Place, Knightsbridge, whose trademark they bore, as
having been specially made for the French Embassy in London, whence,
according to Mr. Bolton's information, they had been forwarded to Paris'.
In l ( .Mj2, it may be remarked, M. Piat was shown in the official directory
of the ^French Ministry of Foreign Affairs as "employed on special
service." The opinion of Sir E. Monson, British Ambassador at Paris,
on Salim Qamri's case is worth quoting: it ran as follows : —
From enquiries which I have caused to be made at the Consulate-General ag to the
circumstances under which Mr. Atlee visited and succeeded in rescuing this unfortunate
man, I have come to the conclusion that his story, romantic and unusual as it appears, is
no invention or hallucination ; and, with the knowledge that his Majesty's Government
possess of the unscrupulous character of many of the men employed by France on official
foreign service in the East, it is not difficult to believe that M. Fiat's action, recklessly
ci uel as it undoubtedly was, has not been exaggerated in the description given by his
Vlct,m * * * * » » I am at the
^arne time quite ready to believe that some of the high officials of the Ministry of
oreign Allaiis would not be disposed to close their eyes to the commission of grave
irregularities to the prejudicj of British interests in the East.
It is not apparent that the proceedings of M. Goguyer or M. Piat in
any way advanced French interests or undermined British influence in the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; and their campaigns had the tendency, common to all cam-
paigns of such a nature, to become less and less effective the longer they
were maintained. It has been thought well to describe thern, however, to
show in what spirit and with what weapons the contest with Britain was
Waged on the part of France. In 1905 the circulation of the " Murshid-
al-Albab still continued, notwithstanding an improvement in the relations
between Britain and France, which took place about 1904 and effaced the
bitter memoiies of lashoda which had inspired French policy at the begin
ning of the period.
Some efforts by French representatives to establish French trade in the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. may be mentioned, but they were of little importance. An
article by M. Ottavi, the French \ ice-Consul at Masqat, in the " Moniteur
Officiel du Commerce ' of the 29th of March 1900 advocated th establish
ment by blench enterprise at Masqat of a " grand magasin de nouveaut^s

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎344] (487/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000058> [accessed 17 October 2018]

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