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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎362] (505/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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The Shaikh
and the
Imperial
Persian
Customs.
Biritsh
support of
Shaikh
against
Russia aM
the central
Persian
Government.
362
der. In 1903 a British Vice-Consul was substituted for the British Con
sular Agent at Karbala; and in 1905 au Assistant for,Trade and Commerce
was added to the staff of the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. at Baghdad. In 1905 a
new Residency A diplomatic office of the British Government established in the provinces and regions considered part of, or under the influence of, British India. built and owned by the British Goveriiinent ; , came under
occupation by the British establishments at Baghdad.
Affairs and foreign relations of 'Arabistan, 1899-1905.
Some of the events of the period in 'Arabistan have already been
described in relating the internal history of Persia, and it only remains to
notice those whieh were specially connected with external politics.
Interest centred chiefly in an effort made by the central Persian
Government, possibly at Russian instigation, to reduce the power of the
Shaikh of Muhammareh,—a design which was frustrated principally
through support lent by the British Government to the Shaikh. In 1900
it became known that the Shah's Government intended to place the customs
of 'Arabistan, hitherto farmed to the Shaikh, under the direct administra
tion of the reorganised Customs Department; and the Shaikh was greatly
alarmed at the prospect, mostly because of the further inroads on his
executive authority which it seemed to him to portend. In 1901 the
transfer of the customs was actually ordered, but Shaikh Khaz'al was
successful in obtaining a respite and sent an agent to Tehran to negotiate
there on his behalf in consultation with British Legation. At
length an arrangement was effected whereby the Shaikh retained the
nominal headship of the customs, while their technical administration was
placed in Belgian hands, and various financial advantages and the continu
ance of certain traditional immunities enjoyed by the Shaikh and his
subjects in regard to customs were conceded to him. In 1903 and 190^
the Persian Government showed a tendency to encroach on the position
which they had granted to the Shaikh with reference to the Customs;
but the Shaikh, with British diplomatic encouragement, successfully
opposed their moves.
The customs question was only one aspect of a larger one,—that of the
Shaikh s political position via a vis of the central Government; and it was
in the wider field of conflict that he benefited most by British support. A 1
the end of 1902, in view of the aggressive action of jTehran, His Britan
nic Majesty's Minister in Persia was authorised to inform the Shaikh, who
was much dismayed by threatened Russian interference in the case, that tht

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎362] (505/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x00006a> [accessed 21 August 2018]

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