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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎370] (513/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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370
all the means at onr disposal. (Cheers.) I say that in no minatory ppirit, because, so
far as I am aware, no proposals are on footforthe establishment of a foreign naval base
in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . I at least have heard of none ; and I cannot help thinking
that the noble lord waxed almost unnecessarily warm at the idea of such a foreign
intrusionj with which, so far as I am aware, we are not at present threatened.
More thau a year before, at an informal interview which he had on
phe 19th of March 1902 with the French Ambassador in London, Lord
Lansdowne had remarked with reference to the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. that Great
Britain "entertained the strongest objection to, and would certainly
oppose, any attempt on the part of other Powers to create strategical
bases or fortified harbours in those waters;" and his statement of the
5th May 1903 was therefore the expression, not of sudden resolve, but
of the deliberate and fixed policy of His Majesty^s Government. The
statement did not escape notice in the quarter to which, doubtless, it
was principally addressed. On the 6th of May the Russian Ambassador
remarked to Lord Lansdowne that he had read it with interest, and
that he saw nothing in it to which exception could be taken. He added
that Lord Lansdowne probably had Russia in his mind when he spoke,
but that Russia had no idea of establishing a naval base in the Persian
Gulf.
The apparent intention of the Russian Government in 1899 to establish
a naval station in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. together with the proceedings of the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. French in regard to Bandar Jissah in the same year, obliged the British
Government to consider what counteractive measures would be required
in case of a Russian, or of a combined Russain and French, scheme being
carried into effect.
To enter in detail on the inquiries which were held, on the discussions
which followed, or on the decisions which were finally leached would be
inexpedient; suffice it to say that the attention of the British Goveminent
was directed to harbours, anchorages and land positions neai the entrance
of the Gulf, and especially to certain points on the islands opposite Bandar
Alabas and on the Ruus-al-Jibal promontory, between which lie the
Straits of Hormuz. In 1902 the situation was considered in its strategical
bearings at a conference between representatives of the Admiralty, War
Office, Foreign Office and India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. in London : and at a later date
the military policy of His Majesty's Government was finally laid down
by the Committee of Imperial Defence. We shall confine ourselves to
describing some more or less overt naval precautions which were taken,
chiefly through the agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. of the Government of India, between the
years 1900 and 1905.
Senior^
'fiaesUou!

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎370] (513/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000072> [accessed 20 February 2018]

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