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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎373] (516/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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373
The possibility of immigration into Basidu, especially from Lingeli
where the regime of the Imperial Persian Customs was now pressing heavily
upon trade, began in 1902 to demand consideration. A merchant of
Qishm town, agent for a Hindu rice-exporting firm at Calcutta, applied for
permission to land 10,000 bags of rice at Basidu and build a godown
near the landing place ; and similar enquiries, made from time to time by
inhabitants of Lingeh and others, some of which are mentioned in the his
tory of the coast of Fars, indicated that Basidu, if the British Government
were prepared to countenance the scheme, might possibly develop into a
customs-free trade distributing centre of considerable importance. The
opinion of a meeting of representatives of the Admiralty and India and
Foreign Offices, held in London in July 1902 to consider questions con
nected with Basidu and other places, was, however, adverse to the
encouragement of immigration on account of the political complications
which it might entail Orders had already been issued by Colonel
Kemball, the Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Persian G ulf, and had been
confirmed by the Government of India, that British subjects should
not be prevented from settling at Basidu if they wished to do so
but that any buildings erected by them should be temporary only,^ and
that the sites should be allotted by the Resident. In Maj 1905^ the
Government ofjndia further directed that the immigration of non -British
settlers should be discouraged so far as possible, and that the Resident
should keep a watch upon the arrival of new settlers, British or foreign,
who might erect huts or appear to be more than passing visitors These
instructions sufficed to prevent, if prevention was really required, an
influx of merchants and others into Basidu.
Basidu was visited in April and May 1901 by a native official of the
Persian Imperial Customs who stated that a Customs employ^ would
shortly be posted at Old Basidu for the prevention o£ the arms trade.
No action followed his visits, but it was laid down by the Indian
authorities that no Persian official should be allowed to reside in the
British station without the express consent of the British Government.
M. Kit man's visit to Basidu in 190-2 and the enquiries of M. I assek
in 1903 about the British position there have already been mentione
as evidences of Russian activity near the entrance of the bult
In 1904 the British telegraph station on Hanjam Island, abandoned fo^occnp.
since 1880, was re-established ; and an extension of telegraphic commumca- H
tion was Ranged, partly by eable and partly by land hue across Qishm ajnt.sh
Island, from I Ian jam to Bandar 'Abbas. At one time it was proposed by (totion .
the naval authorities to locate the new telegraph station at Bas.du, but
Hanjam was ultimately preferred.
at
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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎373] (516/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000075> [accessed 19 October 2018]

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