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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎385] (528/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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The acceleration of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. mail steamer service in 1904 was British
steam
a notable achievement of the period ; it resulted from the establishment by C ommuni-
the British India Steam Navigation Company in return for an increased a1 ^
subsidy, of a fast mail line in addition to an existing slow cargo and mail services in
line. The extra subsidy on account of the rapid service, borne entirely by Q®]^ els ' an
the Government of India, was Rs. 3,00,000 per annum; and the average
speed of the fast line was fixed at 13, and of the slow line at 8 knots an hour.
Kuwait was for the first time definitely included among the Company's
ports of call, and Dibai, though not entered in the schedule of the contract,
was henceforth regularly visited by the Company^ vessels.
A postal subsidy of Rs. 24,000 a year paid by the Government of
India to the Euphrates and Tigris Steam Navigation Company for a
weekly mail service in both directions between Basrah and Baghdad was
renewed for ten years with effect from 1904.
The period was also remarkable for the first considerable extensions of British
. . telegraphs
the telegraph system of the Persian Gult made since 1869 ,• they were in the
dictated by considerations of policy and strategy as well as of commercial Q^" a11
advantage.
The inadequacy of the communications between Masqat and the out- ^shk-^
side world was remedied, first of all, by the laying ol a cable from Jashk cable,
to Masqat which was opened for traffic in November 1901; in this enter
prise, approved though it was in principle by His Majesty s Government,
no financial assistance was rendered to the Government of India by the
British Treasury.
A second and perhaps more important scheme was propounded by the
Government of India in 1900 along with the first, but its realisation was CO nnection.
delayed bj the refusal of the Home Government to undertake a share of
the cost and by doubts of a technical nature as to the best means of caiiy-
ing it into effect; its object was the inclusion of the port of Bandar
'Abbas in the circuit of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. cables. This it was originally
intended to arrange by looping one of the existing cables between Jashk
and Bushehr into the bay of Bandar 'Abbas; but in 1902 a proposal by
the Naval Commander-in-Chief, that telegraphic communication should
be extended to Basidu, suggested the alternative of landing a cable on
Hanjam, where a British telegraph station had existed from 1869 to 1880,
and of constructing a branch thence to Bandar 'Abbas. This alternative
project was finally accepted by His Majesty's Government on the advice of
Lord Curzon after he had personally visited Hanjam in 1903; and in Apiil
1904 one of the Bushehr cables was relanded on the island and the tele
graph station there re-occupied without notice to the Persian Government,
- iUji;

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎385] (528/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000081> [accessed 17 November 2018]

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