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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎393] (536/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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393
for six years. Prom 1 1899 to 1901 the functions of Military Attach^ and
Oriental Secretary in the Legation were combined in a British officer of
the Indian Army ; but after 1901 the Military Attacheship was the only
post at Tehran filled by an officer from India.
tc*
liW
Conclusion.
to resume. An attack on the political predominance of Britain in the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. may be considered to have begun with the first visit of a
Russian surveyor to Hormuz in 1895, but it did not become serious until
1899, when the French sought to secure a naval base in 'Oman. A great
impetus was given to foreign activity by the South African war of 1899
1902, especially in its earlier stages, when a false appreciation of Britain s
future place in the world became current. Those years accordingly
witnessed preparations by Russia for establishing a naval station in the
Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and for constructing a railway across Persia to the sea, as
tojll as the foundation of a Russian line of steamers and trading company
fbr operations in thie Gulf, and intensified efforts by France to push hei
influence in 'Oman. Unmistakable symptoms at the same time showed
that, in the Gulf, Russia and France were actuated to some extent by a
common policy. The more serious manifestations of foreign ambition
were accompanied by Russian and French displays of na\al force and we ^
attended by an increase of Russian consular representation in tht Gu
region. ,
As the British Empire gradually and without loss of stability emerged
from the South African difficulty, some revulsion of feeling and change o
policy on the part of foreign nations became perceptible. The more
dangerous enterprises of Russia were suspended, and e\ entually itt
remained to differentiate the situation in the Gulf fiom that w * c ^
existed before the crisis, except the mercantile undei taking to w ic
Russian Goveniinent had committed themselves and their inflated con u
estabhshments. By the end of 1903 political tension between European
nations in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. had entirely ceased.
The assault on British predominance was energetically met and repelled
at every point. Nothing was conceded even at the period when t e s a
of international politics Was most favourable to the adveisarie- 0 ^ *
and British activity continued unabated even after the causes which pro
voked it had been withdrawn. Effective diplomatic barriers were raised
against dangers from Russia which threatened in Peisia. Fienc in g

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎393] (536/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x000089> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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