Skip to item: of 1,782
Information about this record Back to top
Open in Universal viewer
Open in Mirador IIIF viewer

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎419] (562/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

fL-
i M'
/Tri K
v ■ S f
419
Reign and policy of Hamad, 1784-92.
So far as can be gathered from the meagre accounts of his regency
that are extant, Hamad was a youth of equal moderation and spirit, and
was especially diligent in strengthening the military bases of his power.
By conciliatory treatment he made the Ya'arabi governor of Nakhl his fast
friend for life; with the help of the Bani Kalban he wrested the strong-
fortress of Bahlah from a Shaikh of the 'Abriyin; he fortified Ruwi,
and strengthened the defences of Masqat and Barkah; and he caused a
large frigate, the " Rahmani/^ to be built for him at Zanzibar * In
1790 Masqat, of which the trade and shipping continued to increase, was
the richest and most flourishing port in the whole Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. region.
But the most important measure of Hamad's reign was probably the
transference of the capital from Rustaq in the interior to Masqat upon f r om Rustaq
the sea coast. This was a step fraught with lasting and momentous ^ouum
consequences. It removed the rulers of 'Oman from a situation in which
they could only maintain themselves by military and political efficiency ;
it placed an assured and easily collected customs revenue within their reach,
enabling them to maintain a semblance of authority by bribery alone;
and it eventually exposed them to the influences of a foreign civilisation
which estranged them from the tribes of the interior and diminished
their popularity with their subjects. Had the capital remained at
Rustaq, it is possible that 'Oman might have enjoyed in the following
century the benefits of a more direct and vigorous government, and that
the moral decay of the ruling family might have been less rapid.
Other political changes of importance were in progress at this time. Other signifi
i-iiiiii cun '' in n 0Ya "
A tendency towards hereditary sovereignty, which had already s lown ^ on8>
itself in the time of the Ya'aribah, was confirmed under the first mleis of
the A1 Bu Sa'idi line; but, though the succession was henceforth confined
to one family, no exact principle of devolution was established ; and the new
regime, which may be described as one of imperfect heredity, soon piovtd
to be more fertile of discord than the system of popular election that pie-
ceded it. About this time, also, there came into vogue a practice of granting
appanages to the near relations of the ruler ; and, as these grants generally
took the form of a Waliship or local government, which the holders frequent
ly strove to convert into an independent Shaikhdom, the} conduced to the
dismemberment of the country and to the paralys is of t he central government.
* This veasel wag destroyed by fire in Masqat harbour thiee days before
death. It bore the game name as an older ahip, belonging to the imSm Ahmad, whic
had been emploved against the Malabar pirates and took part in tlie le le
f J D 36 A

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎419] (562/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000a3> [accessed 14 August 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000a3">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;419] (562/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000a3">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0562.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestOpen in Universal viewerOpen in Mirador viewerMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image