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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎424] (567/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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424
Early pro
ceedings of
the Wahhabis
in 'Oman.
Hostilitieu
precipitated,
1803.
Naval cam
paign of the
Wahhabis
against
'Omtn. 1803.
In 1800, after the occupation of the Hasa and Qatif Oases by the
Wahhabis, a large Wahhabi detachment, mounted on horses and camels,
made their way thence by land to Baraimi on the confines of the
Oman Sultanate; here their leader Harlq, a Nubian slave, established
" ^Mified settlement; and here the Na'im, Bani Qitab and other tribes
of Dhahirah, who were unfriendly to the central government of ■'Oman,
quickly identified themselves with the Wahhabi cause. Saiyid Sultan,
ever prompt in action, made peace with his enemy the Qasimi Shaikh
of Ras-al-Khaimah and marched, via Wadi-al-Jizi, against Baraimi;
but the result of the first encounter was so unfavourable that he made a
tiuce with Hariq and retired on Sohar. This temporary respite from
hostilities at home enabled Sultan, as we have seen, to prosecute his
designs against Bahrain with some measure of success ; but, in that direc
tion also, the influence of the Wahhabis, which was thrown into the
scale of the (Jtub, retarded the progress of his arms; and a fresh
breach with the Wahhabi Amir, which occurred in 1803, destroyed his
last hope of success in Bahrain.
The immediate cause of the final rupture seems to have been the
favourable reception by Sultan of overtures from the Sharifs of Makkah,
who were then endeavouring to defend the Hijaz district of Western
Arabia against the assaults of the Wahhabis. Early in 1803 Sultan had
himself gone on pilgrimage to the Holy Cities, leaving 'Oman to be
governed m his absence by his young son Salim, assisted by a council of
icgency ; and, though he did not himself take any active part in the
hostilities between the Sharifs and the Amir, he assisted the former
with money and munitions of war, and possibly also with the loan
of a small armed contingent. During the absence of Sultan his nephew
Badar, the son of Saif, after failing in an attempt to obtain posses
sion of Fort Jalali at Masqat, fled to 'Ajman and thence to Zubarah 18th-century town located 105 km from Doha. ,
eventually making bit? \va_y to Dara'iyah, where he associated himself
closely with the Wahhabi Amir.
The resentment of the Wahhabi ruler at Sultan's conduct in Hijaz
affairs, intensified by the aversion which he already felt for him as
an Ibadhi heretic, at length broke forth in a declaration of war.
As suzerain of the Qawasim of Ras-al-Khaimah and of the 'Utub of
Bahrain and Kuwait, the Wahhabi Amir now called upon them, unwilling
ough t ey were to abandon the pearl fishery for the season, to cruise
agamst the subjects of the 'Oman Government; and they reluctantly
Tv, & p Umm<,nS ' ■^ arrnec l by a new development that seemed to
threaten the future safety of their own coasts, the Persian and Turkish
au on ies m e Gulf at first showed a disposition to make common cause

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎424] (567/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000a8> [accessed 20 May 2018]

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