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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎425] (568/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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425
Tmrnm
M
i
with Saiyid Sultan ; but for want of courage, or possibly of the appropriate
means, their good intentions remained inoperative ; and the ruler of ■'Oman
was left to bear the brunt of the Wahhabi's displeasure alone. Sultan
(juickly destroyed the war fleet of the 'Utub ; but his enemies were too
numerous for him, even at sea; and he found himself unable to undertake
offensive operations and at the same time protect his own coasts from
ravage. A descent by a hostile squadron on the island of Qishm,
then a dependency of 'Oman, which they overran and pillaged, was
among the incidents of this maritime warfare.
At last, a mission having been sent by Sultan to Dara'iyah, a truce
was concluded for three years on condition that'Oman should pay an
annual tribute of 112,000, and that a Wahhabi political agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. should be
allowed to reside at Masqat. The truce, however, had hardly begun,
when it was violated by the Wahhabis.
The Wahhabi troops under Hariq entered the Batinah district, com
mitting unspeakable atrocities as they advanced towards Masqat; and a
force despatched by Saiyid Sultan for the defence of Suwaiq, which
was in danger, was ambushed by them in difficult ground and almost
altogether annihilated. In this emergency a national council of war was
convened by Saiyid Sultan at Barkah, and it was resolved to continue
the struggle against the invaders to the uttermost. The first object of
the patriotic assembly was to raise the siege of Sohar, where Hariq, after
his successful action near Suwaiq, had invested Qais ; and Khaburah
was appointed as a place of rendezvous for the tribes of 'Oman. When,
however, a large force had collected at Khaburah and was about to march
on Sohar, Hariq, who in the meanwhile had probably received intelligence
of the assassination of his master 'Abdul 'Aziz at Dara'iyah, withdrew
fi'om Sohar to Baraimi; and the 'Omani leaders, satisfied apparently with
the retirement of the enemy, allowed the great tribal muster to disperse.
Peace made,
but violated
by the
Wahbabis.
Land cam
paign of the
Wahhabis
against
'Oman.
Relations of Saiyid Sultan with Britain, 1792-1804.
A choice of policy, more momentous even than his decision to resist
the Wahhabis, was imposed on Saiyid Sultan by the strife which
prevailed from 1793 to 1802 between the British and the French in
eastern seas; his final decision was not taken, however, until J79S.
British interests in''Oman were still represented by a native biokei, ^ a J- rs . n
who in 1793 asked to be supplied with a British pass and flag for a 'Oman from
vessel that he owned. In 1796 Lieutenant Skinner was sent to Masqat 1792 to 1 .
with a ship, with instructions to enquire whether there were any

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎425] (568/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000a9> [accessed 19 October 2018]

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