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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎427] (570/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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in his dominions to the French and Dutch nations, so long as a state of
war should prevail between their Governments and the British East
India Company ; to dismiss from his service and expel from 'Oman an
employe of French nationality; to exclude French vessels, which then
made Masqat a base for privateering operations against British
commerce, from the inner anchorage used by British ships, or, in case
of a fracas occurring in the port, to lend active assistance to the
British; and, finally, to permit the British to establish, should they
wish to do so, a large fortified Factory and a sepoy garrison at the
port of Bandar 'Abbas, which the Saiyid then held on lease from Persia.
Dissuaded, however, by the Company's broker Often a local commercial agent in the Gulf who regularly performed duties of intelligence gathering and political representation. , he refused to permit
a British Factory at Masqat, on the ground that such a concession
might involve him in a war with the French and the Dutch; and,
though he at first agreed to receive an English gentleman as political
agent at Masqat, he subsequently withdrew his consent under the
influence of the broker Often a local commercial agent in the Gulf who regularly performed duties of intelligence gathering and political representation. , who represented that constant disputes would
result. Saiyid Sultan requested that his vessels in Indian ports might
he supplied with wood and water free of charge, a privilege enjoyed
by British vessels visiting Masqat, and that each of his ships might
be allowed to discharge 5,000 maunds of salt at Calcutta instead of
1,000 maunds only, which was the maximum prescribed for ordinary
Arab vessels ; both of these points were referred by the Mirza to the
Bombay Government for a decision. Saiyid Sultan also wrote a letter
to the Governor of Bombay, acknowledging the presents which he
had received, and assuring him that a vessel which he had despatched
to Mauritius had been sent there only to obtain restitution, if possible,
of a ship seized by the French. The removal from his post of Narotam
Ram Chandar Raoji, the broker Often a local commercial agent in the Gulf who regularly performed duties of intelligence gathering and political representation. , whom the envoy represented as
favourably disposed to the French and the Dutch, was ordered by
the authorities at Bombay; but in the meanwhile he died. His place was
given to Vishn Das, a nominee of Mehdi Ali Khan, who was
entertained on a salary of Rs. 100 per mensem ; but this appointment
also was not entirely suitable, for it was afterwaids found that Vis^n
Das was in the service of Saiyid Sultan.
In the year following the conclusion of the Agreement, facts came to
notice which brought the attitude of Saiyid Sultan towards the British
Government once more under suspicion ; in particular it wan alleged that
he still employed Frenchmen in his service and exhibited a partiality
their nation; that his governor of Zanzibar had shown incivility to Com
modore Blankett of the Royal Navy, who happened to call there
^—/
Suspected
contiuuaBce
of relations
and corre
spondence
between
Saiyid Sul
tan, andthe
French,
1799.
■ n |1 :
,
i jt' 1 " •

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎427] (570/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000ab> [accessed 14 August 2018]

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