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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎429] (572/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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429
w ^t jfyij,.
\ fss I
isianirSm^" ^
,oal(! *
gji Politic
^ipbicia 1 *'
ae
'so lie ^ '■
irifl
Sultan on bo&id his slup 1 ho Cxunjav^ in tlio iinchorcigG bfttwGGii
the islands of Qishm and Han jam. On the next day, " after a short
but explicit conversation/' Saiyid Sultan, on whose mind the submission
of the whole western coast of India to the British power—and possibly
the failure of Bonaparte in Syria—had produced a deep impression, set
his seal to a new Agreement which Captain Malcolm, though without
definite instructions on the subject, thought it advisable to propose ; this
document confirmed the former treaty in its entirety and provided for the
admission of a British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Masqat, as a means of averting
misunderstandings. Captain Malcolm then continued on his voyage to
Bushehr, virile Saiyid Sultan sent to Masqat for Dr. Bogle, who joined
him at Hm jam on the 12 th of February; and when the "Gunjava - "
returned to Masqat, on the 29th of that month. Dr. Bogle had already
eetablifhed himself in the Saiyid's confidence and regard and had received
from Captain Malcolm written instructions to assume the position of
British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Masqat. Saiyid Sultan requested, both through
Captain Malcolm and Dr. Bogle, that eight or ten European artillerymen
might be sent from Bombay to replace several French employes whom he
was about to discharge from his service; it does not appear, however,
whether this concession was granted. Shortly before the arrival of
Captain Malcolm in the Gulf the Saiyid had sought the good offices of
the Bombay Government for the purpose of obtaining a ship for himself
at Bombay.
In 1800 Saif-bin-Muhammad, who was acting as regent of •'Oman Further rela-
during the absence of the Saiyid on an expedition against the Qawasim, gaiyidSiiltan
wrote to Mirza Mehdi 'Ali Khan complaining that a permit given to his with Britain,
master by the Government of Bombay for the importation of 10,000
maunds of salt at Calcutta had been disregarded by the authorities in
Bengal. The Resident in reply reminded him of the recent suspicious
dealings of his Government with the French at Masqat, and advised him
" to look upon the friendship and esteem of the English Government as
the soul by which Muscat breathes and has its being," and to " fly the
continuation of the French fraternity as you would the plague. - " At
the same time, irritated perhaps by Captain Malcolm's supersession of
himself in Persia and by the appointment of Dr. Bogle at Masqat, he
suggested to the Governor of Bombay that the Saiyid should be attacked
on account of his "ambiguous connection/"'and that a lease of Masqat
to the British, which might be had for the asking, should be obtained
from the Shah of Persia; but these suggestions appear to have been
ignored. The seizure of Saiyid Sultan's salt at Calcutta was subse
quently shown to have been due to his having neglected to obtain p
1800.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎429] (572/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000ad> [accessed 17 October 2018]

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