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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎430] (573/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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430
British Poli
tical Agents,
1800-03.
Repnlse of a
French mis
sion in accor
dance with
the Britisli
treaties,
1803.
Reasons
of Saiyid
Sultan's
adherence to
British
intweat.
certificate covering tlie consignment from the Company^ broker Often a local commercial agent in the Gulf who regularly performed duties of intelligence gathering and political representation. at
Masqat.
Dr. Bogle, the first British Agent or Resident at M asqat, died in less
than a year, a victim of the Masqat climate, and was succeeded in 1801
by Captain David Seton of the Bombay Army, Ill-health obliged
Captain Seton in 1802 to take a yearns leave to India, but in June 1803
he returned to his post.
The fidelity of Saiyid Sultan to his engagements with the British
power was after this subjected to a severe test; but he emerged with credit
from the ordeal. General de Caen, who in the spring of 180o had been
appointed by Napoleon to be Captain-General of the French possessions
in the East and had received a special commission to report on the poai-
tion of the British iu India, now established himself in Mauritius, and
thence despatched, in September 1803, a M. de Cavaignac whom Napo
leon had himself invested with the quality of French Consul and
Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Masqat. On the 3rd of October 1808 M. de Cavaig-
nae reached Masqat in the French frigate "(Atalanta/' a well-known
ship of her day. Fortune at first seemed to smile upon his enterprise,
for Captain Seton had left Masqat on a cruise in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. and
the town was full of French sympathisers, chiefly merchants and others
vrho had commercial relations with Mauritius. While awaiting the re
turn o£ Saiyid Sultan, then engaged at a distance in negotiating with
the Wahhabi commander, M. de Cavaignac was made aware of the exis
tence of the British agreements of 1798 and 1800, hitherto apparently
unknown to the French; this discovery may perhaps have prepared him
for the ultimate failure of his mission. On the l , 2th of October Saiyid
Sultan arrived in his capital and immediately informed the French
mission that, while he was willing to discuss commercial matters, he could
not, on account of his agreements with the British, accept a French re
presentative at Masqat, or even entertain proposals on such a subject. So
decided was his attitude that no interview at all took place between him and
M. de Cavaignac, and the " Atalanta," after remaining one day more iu
port to test the finality of his reply, vanished under cover of night.
That Saiyid Sultan consented to enter into an exclusive arrangement
with the British and that, having done so, he scrupulously regarded its
obligations are facts of which the explanation is to be sought in the
importance to the inhabitants of 'Oman of the Indian trade, rather than
in any personal preference on the part of the ruler for Englishmen
over Frenchmen. It seems to have been directly intimated to Sultan
more than once, that, were he to throw in his lot with the French,

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎430] (573/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000ae> [accessed 19 August 2018]

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