Skip to item: of 1,782

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎433] (576/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

1 w
433
wiegijj
OTD? rioi, l®!!
0 "
HDSt l ai
iiicaptwi
mo, MSf
i (imej in d* 5
ijngtlj seized
occasioned moet friction with Britain ; and as late as 1801 it became
necessary to remonstrate with him on the continued presence of
Justaig-ne at Masqat.
In 1797-98 ; and even ]ater ; there seems to have been constant communi
cation between Masqat and Mauritius. In 1 797 the " Lakhshmi/' com
manded by Captain Crouch^ who was possibly an American, visited Masqat
from Batavia and then sailed for Mauritius ; and in 1798 it was reported
by Captain Spence of the u Pearl" that there was a Frenchman at
Masqat who kept two small vessels running 1 between that port and
Mauritius.
The case of the " Pearl/'' already referred to above, is somewhat
obscure; but the following seem to be the facts. On the 23rd of Septem
ber 1799 a French war vessel either passed Masqat at sea, or called there
and was hospitably received ; she then proceeded up the Gulf in search
of British shipping. On the 29th ©f the same month a British cruiser
with a crew of only 60 or 70 men arrived from Bushehr at Masqat, took
in supplies, and went in pursuit of the Frenchman. Meanwhile the
French warship had apparently captured the " Pearl/"'—a native vessel
under the British flag, with a partly British crew, and bound for India,—
on board of which were some horses belonging to Mr. Manesty, the
British Resident at Basrah, and some property of Mirza Mehdi J Ali Khan,
the British Resident at Bushehr. The British and French war ships
seem after this to have encountered, with the result that both took fire
and blew up; but the <c Pearl " was brought by the French to Masqat,
where Mr. Manesty's horses were bought in by the Company^s broker Often a local commercial agent in the Gulf who regularly performed duties of intelligence gathering and political representation.
and the rest of the cargo was disposed of as already mentioned.
Mr. Cramlington, one of the officers of the ill-fated " Pearl," died at
Bombay in November 1799 before full information had been obtained
from him on the subject.
The dealings of Saiyid Sultan with Tipu Sahib may be regarded as a
branch of his relations with the French, with whom the ruler of Mysore
maintained a connection. The Mysore political agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. founded at
Masqat in the reign of the Imam Ahmad continued to exist under Saiyid
Sultan, but it was now apparently described as a " Factory 3> ; and in
1797 it was reported that five or six vessels under Mysore colours visited
the port every year. Tipu Sahib's representatives seem to have quitted
Masqat somewhat hurriedly soon after the installation of Dr. Bogle there
as British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , and suffered shipwreck, it was said, on the coast
of Kach in returning to India ; their master, it should be remembered,
was by this time dead.
37
Communica"
tion with
Mauritius,
1797-98.
Case of the
" Pearl,"
1799.
Dealings of
Saiyid Sultan
with Tipu
Sahih of
Mysore,
1792-1800,

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎433] (576/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000b1> [accessed 20 February 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000b1">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;433] (576/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000b1">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0576.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image