Skip to item: of 1,782

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎442] (585/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

Transcription

This transcription is created automatically. It may contain errors.

Apply page layout

Hostilities
between Sai
yid Sa 'id
and the
Wahhsbip,
1809.
Anglo-
'Omfini
eip edition
against
Shinas, ISOf.
bin-Saqar suddenly appeared upon the scene with a superior force and
drove them to their ships with heavy loss, Qais-bin-Ahmad being amon^
the slain. Later in the same year, the Wahhabis removed Sultan-bin-
Saqar from the Shaikhship of Kas-al-Khaimah and substituted Husain-
biu-'Ali, Shaikh of Kams, as governor on their part over the Qawasim •
and, on the same occasion apparently, they placed a garrison of their
own troops at Khor I'akkan.
In 1809 S'aiyid Sa'id, taking advantage of the absence of the Wahhabi
Amir at Makkah and relying on assistance promised by the Shaikh of
Bushehr, by the 'Utub, and by a discontented sectiou of the Qawasim,
proceeded to the Gulf with au armament with the intention, it was sup
posed, of attacking the new Wahhabi chief of the Qawasim; but his allies
failed to co-operate with him as they should have done, and he was obliged
to return to Masqat without having effected anything. The Wahhabis, who
still maintained apolitical agent at Masqat and whose religious emissaries
had established a sort of inquisition in the town, now summoned Sa'id to
join with the Qawasim and 'Utub in a naval expedition against Kuwait
and Basrah ; and only by the stationing of the British frigate "Cornwallis"
off Has Musandam, a measure which prevented the exit of piratical
expeditions against his coasts from the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , was the Saiyid enabled
to evade compliance with their imperious demands. But the general
countenance and naval support of the British Government could not save
him from paying by land the penalty of his persistent, though somewhat
indirect, opposition to the policy of the Wahhabis. By seizing Muhammad-
bin-Nasir, the same whom he had unjustly accused of the murder of Badar,
and by imprisoning him until he delivered up the forts of Samail and
Bidbid, Sa'id had estranged a valuable supporter ; and Muhammad-bin-
Nasir, after securing the friendship of the Bani Ruwahah and of Hamaid-
bin-Nasir of 'Amain, betook himself to the headquarters of the Wahhabi
Amir. The Amir, whose intentions in regard to 'Oman have already been
mentioned, was then easily induced to despatch an expedition under Mutlaq
the Mutam, accompanied by Muhammad -bin-Nasir, against 'Oman.
It was at this juncture, in 1809, that the Government of India des
patched their first expedition against the Qawasim. the proceedings of
which beyond the limits of the Saiyid's dominions are related* elsewhere in
their proper place. Colonel Lionel Smitk, the Bxitish commander, after
carrying out his instructions at Ras-al-Khaimah, Lmgeh and Laft,
leturned to Masqat, where he held a consultation with Sa'id as to the
propriety of further measures. The Wahhabi general Mutlaq, who had
arrived to o late to assist the Q awasim in the defence of Ras-al-Khaimah,
Vtde page 183 ante and page t)43 j)ogt.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
View the complete information for this record

Use and share this item

Share this item
Cite this item in your research

'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎442] (585/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000ba> [accessed 26 May 2018]

Link to this item
Embed this item

Copy and paste the code below into your web page where you would like to embed the image.

<meta charset="utf-8"><a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000ba">'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [&lrm;442] (585/1782)</a>
<a href="https://www.qdl.qa/en/archive/81055/vdc_100023575943.0x0000ba">
	<img src="https://images.qdl.qa/iiif/images/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/IOR_L_PS_20_C91_1_0585.jp2/full/!280,240/0/default.jpg" alt="" />
</a>
IIIF details

This record has a IIIF manifest available as follows. If you have a compatible viewer you can drag the icon to load it.https://www.qdl.qa/en/iiif/81055/vdc_100000000884.0x000148/manifestMore options for embedding images

Use and reuse
Download this image