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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎465] (608/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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465
So&-
49 casualties before they were driven off. On the 2nd of March 1821 the
British force arrived before Balad Bani Bu "'Ali, where the skeletons of
their predecessors still strewed the ground. The warriors of the tribe,
about a thousand strong, repeating their formerly successful tactics, rushed
out of the village and fell sword in hand upon the right brigade, when stiff
fighting and some confusion followed; but, once the rush had been stemmed,
the Bani Bu 'Ali were practically defeated ; the village was quickly
surrendered; and the tribe this time consented to lay down their arms.
Saiyid Sa'id was present, but only as a spectator of the engagement.
The British casualties were 26 killed and 171 wounded, while the enemy
left 235 dead upon the field besides carrying off, it was supposed, as
many more. The prisoners, among whom were the principal chief
Muhammad-bin-''Ali and his brother Khadim, numbered about 250, and
of these nearly 100 were wounded. Some 80 of the prisoners were made
over to Saiyid Sa^id, who allowed them to die of starvation at Masqat ;
but 150 others, including Shaikh Muhammad-bin-^ Ali, were conveyed to
Bombay and were well treated there. After an interval of two years,
when the assent of the Saiyid to their return had with some difficulty
been obtained, the Bombay prisoners were repatriated at the expense of
the Government of India, and were provided with funds to enable them to
make a fresh start in life. As a tribe, however, the Bani Bu ^Ali have
never fully recovered the position which they once held in 'Oman.
The relations of the British Government with the Sultan of Oman
arising from the British military occupation of the island of Qishm
under his authority from 1820 to 18 , 22 or 1823 are fully described in
the chapter on the history of the Persian Coast.
Notwithstanding the example Krade of the Bani Bu 'Ali, outrages
continued to be committed by pirates and wreckers under the jurisdiction
of Masqat, and even by the Bani Bu 'Ali themselves.
In 1829 a small vessel belonging to a Mr. Shipton was attacked and
plundered on a voyage from the Red Sea by dependents of Saiyid Sa id,
but the Sultan took immediate steps in the matter, with the result that
in the first instance $6,000, and later 1,000 crowns, were recoveied from
the pirates and remitted to the Government of Bombay.
About the same time the British ship " Oscar having gone ashoie
on the coast of the Ja'alan district on her way from Bombay to Bushehi,
was boarded by Arabs, chiefly belonging to the Bani Bu Ali and Bani
Bu Hasan tribes, who plundered her of her cargo worth eight lakhs of
rupees, the greater part of which, but for their violence, might have
been saved. Under the orders of the Bombay Government, whom the
underwriters in India had approached with strong representations on
the subject, the Resident in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. then proceeded in the
schooner " Fly/' accompanied by Commodore Collinson in the
British
occupation of
Qishm
Island, 1820-
1882.
Maritime
outrage by
subjects of
the 'Oman
Sultanate,
1829.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎465] (608/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000009> [accessed 17 October 2018]

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