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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎488] (631/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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Otter diffi
culties.
The "Clyde "
incident,
October 1869.
British Poli
tical Agent
changed,
1869.
488
peace; and it was explained to 'Azzan that, while debarred from descents
by sea on foreign or disputed territory, he was not restricted in regard to
naval movements within his own territorial waters: 'Azzan in return
professed himself grateful and desirous to please the British Government
in every respect.
Meanwhile, however, an attack on the private house of Mr. Shore, the
British Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. Accountant, had been threatened, "should the sounds of a
concertina proceed therefrom"; and in August and September some
tobacco in which British subjects were interested was seized by the
Masqat authorities and destroyed by them in accordance with their
religious principles. A little later an attempt was made by the local
administration to detain the « Prince of Wales ", a ship under the British
flag, which they claimed as belonging of right to the navy of ^Oman and
as having been unwarrantably carried off by Salim at his departure from
Masqat; but in this matter they yielded to the protests of Colonel
Disbrowe.
On the 15th of October a much more serious incident occurred. The
Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , having received notice of an intended attack by Nasir-
bm-Tbuwaini of Gwadar upon Masqat, requested the officer in com-
tnand of the "Clyde" to move her to a different berth under Fort
Jalah ; but he had omitted to inform the local authorities, and the
garrison of the fort, not understanding the reason of the manoeuvre,
opened a fire of matchlocks on the "Clyde" and maintained it for
half-an-hour. The Political Resident A senior ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul General) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Residency. in the Gulf was ordered to proceed
to Masqat at once, and arrangements were made for collecting a British
naval force there in case reparation should be refused. Colonel Pelly,
owever, was successful in obtaining a written apology from the Kli a .liH J
w o was in charge of Masqat during the absence of 'Azzan, as well
as an oral apology made publicly by a deputation of five notables on
board the "Dalhousie"; and on the 3rd of November'Azzan himself
expressed, m unqualified terms, his regret at what had happened and his
respect for the British Government. Colonel Pelly reported on this occa
sion that the British Indian subjects at Masqat did not complain of
being themselves oppressed, and that their two chief grievances were
e enforcement of the Muhammadan law of creditor and debtor and of a
prohibition against the purchase of tobacco by Masqat subjects, which
affected a branch of their trade. J
hrnvve ^ wlien matters ^ad quieted down, Colonel Die-
uZ 7 r, " t0 a,l0the '-P- 4 -d succeeded at Masqat by
ay, the latter being placed in strict subordination to the Resident
0 I
Wizan'si

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎488] (631/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000020> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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