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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎494] (637/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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494
Renewed
struggle in
Batinah,
1872.
Departure
of 'Abdul
Aziz and
Salim to
India, loss
of Khaburah,
recovery of
GwSdar and
loss of
Chabhar,
1872.
Recovery by
tbe Sultan of
the -whole of
the Batinah
coast, 1873.
Renewed
activity of
the rebels,
attacks on
Gwadar, and
deportation
of 'Abdul
'Aziz to
India, 1873.
In the spring of 1872 Ibrahim succeeded in repossessing- himself of
Majis and Shinas, and laid siege to Liwa ; but the forces of the Sultan
inflicted a severe defeat on him in the Dabbagh quarter of the latter town
and the places which had been lost were recovered.
About the same time Salim, operating from a base in Ja'alan, attempted
to seize Sur; but this attempt also was foiled. At the beginning of May
in the absence at Bombay of Saiyid ^Abdul 'Aziz, a detachment of
^ ahhabi mercenaries was sent over to Gwadar and re-occupied the place
in the name of Turki; but in the meanwhile Chahbar had passed irretriev
ably out of the possession of 'Abdul 'Aziz into that of Persia. The
course of events in autumn was less favourable to the Sultan; for in
September Salim made a raid upon Quryat, in which the Wali'of that
place was wounded, and then again threatened Sur, while Khaburah fell
once more into the hands of Ibrahim-bin-Qais. At the end of the year
the situation again improved, for Salim, having failed to raise a party in
'Oman, left Sur in a native sailing boat for Bombay.
In July 1873 Turki, fortified by the renewal in his favour of the
Zanzibar subsidy and assisted by the Na'im tribe, felt himself strong
enough to undertake the reduction of Sohar; and on this occasion
Ibrahim, who a short time before had received the fort of Hazam also
as a gift from his relative Hamud-bin-Faisal of Rustaq, surrendered
after an investment of a few days only. The entire Batinah coast was
ceded to Turki, while Ibrahim in return merely received a bonus of §5,000
and a pension of §100 a month, the latter conditional upon his living
at or neai Hibi, the only place of strength that remained to him of his
former possessions.
Immediately aftei this success of the Sultan the rebel party again
became veiy active. Abdul 'Aziz and Salim having left Bombay
in separate Baghlahs about the end of May, the former, towards the close
of July, invested Gwadar and nearly succeeded in capturing it. In
August an attempt was made by Salih-biu -'Ali to advance on Masqat;
but it was frustrated by the Ghafiri Nidabiyin and Rahbiyin, who pre^
vented his passage through Wadi-al-'Aqq; a contingent of A1
Wahibah, whom Salih had sent in advance, £jund themselves in a somewWt
precarious position under the walls of Matrah. In September 'Abdul
' Aziz was captured at sea near Sur by the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , Major
Mockle., in H.M.S. a Rifleman", and was deported to Karachi,
wheie he was kept in honourable detention; a warrant under
Regulation III of 1818 was however prepared, in case he should at any
fcie attempt to escape or to abuse his comparative freedom. A little
the partial advantages gained by Turki were countervailed by the

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎494] (637/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000026> [accessed 22 May 2018]

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