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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎505] (648/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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:
»° Ns >t
; fc « «*!.;:
1
ie 6 M iimsfif,
^ H ini," [
Masqat toffujjjj r
^ with tte ^jijjj;;
^•feripnj
soon aftd Uf
bafi, fitl 3| ma
improper use h K
w on abit m I tj lit
•The kt ns I k :
JffipleaplooTbii''
rtlievWIjefiidti:
• V I
d to tte attsci, 1?
asqat, 187W
not free fmfe
Sj Saijid 'AW
idnotagaiasestoi
rents aDifodfe'
'he Samail fort
j garrison oft^-
i tte walls in
endei'ed
lB g negotiafe 1 '
ithers;^^;
assmned ^ ftl '■
at Qnirii
Solved iis 01
from ^Oman ; and Turk! on the other hand refused to grant him terms
except on condition of his residing out of the country.
The principal event of 1876, however, was a serious incursion into ^
the Sultan's territories by Hamud-bin-Sa'id the Jahafi. This pestilent Hamud the
rascal, who had been imprisoned by Turki in April, was very imprudently JdhRii ' 18 ' 6,
released at the request of Salih-bin-'Ali in July ; and in September he
descended from Sharqiyah on the Batinah accompanied by a gang of
marauders, without the approval, it would seem, on this occasion of either
Salih-bin-'Ali or Ibrahim-bin-Qais. Passing through Rustaq he com
mitted depredations at Jammah, all but captured the Sultan's second
eon Faisal and favourite Numaish at Tarif, and so reached Sib; but, on
finding that the British Indian traders there had withdrawn leaving
little booty behind, he plundered the bazaar of what it contained and pro
ceeded to Saham, securing at the latter place some property of Hindus
which the owners had not time to remove or to conceal. Hamud next
joined himself to the Ma'awal of Wadi Ma'awal, whose relations with the
Sultan had always been bad—chiefly on account of lands confiscated by
'Azzan-bin-Qais and bought in by the MVawal at a low price and
who at this time were in overt rebellion. The people of !Nakhl and
Samail, however, having come to blows with the Maa^al and inflicted
severe loss upon them, the intervention of the Sultan was sought, and
he seized the opportunity to obtain the expulsion of Hamud from the
Ma'awal country.
In 1877 afresh attempt was made on Masqat by the discontented
subjects of the Sultan. The moving spirit as usual was Salih-bin- Ali,
assisted by the Mutawwa' party, and an attempt was made to give the
movement a creditable appearance by alleging "His Highness s ineli-
giousness and laxity of morals " as the chief cause of popular dissatisfac
tion. The approach of the rebels was announced by a letter from
Salih-bin-'Ali which reached Mr. Robertson, the Acting Political
Agent at Masqat, on the 9th of June. Mr. Robertson was entirely
new to his position, and H.M.S. " Teazer" had left the port the
day before; but Colonel Miles was still at Masqat, and Mr. Robertson
acted in consultation with him in the crisis which followed. On the 14th
of June the rebels, notwithstanding a written remonstrance from the
Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , pushed on to Matrah and occupied that town unopposed,
not, however, before Mr. Robertson and Colonel Miles had removed the
Hindu traders of the place with their valuables to boats in the haibour.
The Khojahs at this time desired to remain in their foit, wheie they con
sidered themselves safe. Salih had failed to persuade Abdul Aziz to join
him upon this occasion, but he was accompanied by Hamud t e a a ,
Second rebel
attack on Mas
qat, J tine
1877.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎505] (648/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000031> [accessed 20 August 2018]

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