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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎509] (652/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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wisis 1
Jl, Oct ■
t\ k "J;il '''
509
from Sarur to Sharqiyah. At length, on the 19th of October, Colonel
Miles the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , received intimation from 'Abdul 'Aziz of an
impending attack on Masqat; it was accompanied by a request that
arrangements should be made for removing British subjects out of harm's
way The Sultan, who on this occasion appeared to great advantage and
showed much energy, concentrated his forces to the number of about 500
men for the defence of Masqat, leaving Matrah somewhat slenderly
gurrisoned; this disposition, as events turned out, was the best that
could have been made. Meanwhile British Indian subjects at Masqat
were required by the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. to ship their valuables and to be in
readiness to embark themselves, and the Hindu traders at Matrah were
brought round for greater safety to Masqat; but the Khojahs of Matrah
were left to their own discretion and elected, for the most part, to remain
in their fort. On the 21st of October the advance guard of the rebel
army arrived at Ruwi ; and at 1-30 a.m . on the 22nd a determined
and altogether unexpected assault, led by 'Abdul 'Aziz m person,
was made at three separate points upon the wall of Masqat town.
This direct attack on Masqat by way of the Wadi-al-Kabir was
considered to be a remarkable departure from the time-honoured
custom by which Matrah was occupied first and used as a base
against Masqat. The night was dark, the assailants were dressed m
black and provided with scaling-ladders, and the garrison, though on
the alert, were not expecting an alarm ; but the attack was repulsed,
the Sultan himself proceeding to the ramparts; and the rebels
retreated with a loss of about 30 men killed and bO wounded. Abdul
5 Aziz fe 1 J back on Sidab and thence on Ruwi, rejoining Salih who had
not risked his person in these operations, though a small nocturnal
attack had been made by his men upon the walls of Matrah.
On the 22nd the Sultan, doubtful of his ability to defend Masqat
without assistance, obtained from the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. a piomise of
support by H. M. S. "Philomel" which was then m harbour ;
and all British subjects in the town, except those attached to
the Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. , were ordered to betake themselves to boats. Duiiu^
day a welcome reinforcement of 7 0 Jannabah anived fiom Sm in the
Sultan's steam-yacht " Dar -as-Salam "; and in the evening Colonel Miles
with the "Philomel" paid a visit to Matrah, and, aftei causing a couple
of 7-ineh shells to be thrown over the rebels' position to prevent their
advancing against the ill-defended walls, returned to Masqat. On
23rd the Sultan asked that occasional shots night be fired by the
"Philomel " to keep the enemy at a distance during the following night,
ri;

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎509] (652/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000035> [accessed 26 May 2018]

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