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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎538] (681/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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538
who had beeu his companion on his visit to Zanzibar; and on the next
day Hainud the Jahafi, likewise a sharer in the excursion to Zanzibar,
made his appearance: each of these three chiefs was attended by a small
armed following. After according the Shaikhs an audience, the Sultan, on
the evening- of the 12th of February, sent them $1,201) in cash and the
usual presents of dismissal; but the trio still lingered in the town ; and,
after dark, numbers of their followers began to straggle in from outside.
This circumstance excited the suspicions of the Sultanas Hadhramauti
and Wahhabi mercenaries, who hastened to inform their master; but the
Sultan declined to believe that his guests could possibly contemplate so
great a breach of Arab honour as an attack upon himself. About
4 a.m ., however, on the morning of the 1 3th, the Bedouins within the
walls seized the gates of the town by surprise and admitted from outside
a large body of confederates who had hitherto remained at Ruwi. The
house of Saif-bin-Badar, the Sultanas commander-in-chief, was surrounded ;
the new palace was invaded; and an attempt was made to force a way
into the old palace, where the Sultan was, for the purpose of taking his
life. After defending himself bravely in his apartment for a considerable
time the Sultan, preceded by his wife and sister-in-law, reached the British
Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. over the intervening house-roofs and thence betook himself to
iort Jalali, while his brother Muhammad made good his escape to Fort
Mirani.
Measures were instantly taken by the British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. for
protecting, bo far as possible, the lives and property of British sub
jects. Colonel Hayes Sadler addressed a letter to'Abdullah, the rebel
leader, warning him that he would be held personally responsible for
any injuiy that might occur; notices of nationality were affixed to the
doois of the Hindu traders in Masqat; and the Khojahs of Matrah were
given a British flag to hoist over their fort. The British Indian
military guard were brought into the Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. for its defence.
Meanwhile determined attempts were made by the Sultan's adherents,
supported by heavy gun and rifle tire from Fort Jalali, to recover the
palace, the house of the late Saiyid Fahad, and the customs house; but
all were repulsed. A message was next received by Colonel Hayes Sadler
from the rebels, suggesting that further steps should be taken for
the protection of British subjects at Matrah, where Shaikh Salih was shortly
expected; and the Agent in reply informed the leaders that the liability
for damage at Matrah, as well as at Masqat, would rest with themselves.
By evening the insurgents, whose number did not in the beginning exceed
300 men, were masters of the town and of its gates; but the Sultan still

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎538] (681/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000052> [accessed 25 May 2018]

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