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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎539] (682/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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) ^UOIl
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539
held the principal forts on the harbour, a tower in the south-eastern part of
the town wall, and all the block-houses on the adjacent hills. The revolu
tionary leaders, who had their men under perfect control and restrained
them from plundering, gave it to be generally understood that they had
come, not to rob, but to set up a ruler who would be able to make his
power respected throughout the country.
On the 14;th of February the British India Steam Navigation
Company^ mail steamer entered the harbour, but passengers for Masqat
were not allowed to land ; and the vessel herself was immediately des
patched to Chahbar with a telegram from the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , informing
the Resident of the situation that had arisen and asking for naval assist
ance. The Sultan requested that the steamer might be sent to bur to
fetch a reinforcement of loyal tribesmen from that port, but his applica
tion was refused by Colonel Hayes Sadler, who considered it now the more
necessary to observe a strict neutrality because the town was in the
hands of the rebels and they had the lives and property of many British
subjects entirely at their mercy. The insurrectionaries spent the day
in wrecking the Sultanas palaces and in auctioning such of his effects
as they did not destroy ; some of the property thus sold was bought in
by British Indian traders with the object of saving it for His Highness.
On this day the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. received a letter from Abdullah,
in which an attempt was made to establish a community of intciest
between the rebel leaders and the British representative, and gieat
deference was expressed for the opinion of the latter ; but Colon* 1
Hayes Sadler merely replied that what he required was the protection of
British subjects and of their property.
Early on the 15th of February the white Mutawwa' flag was sfen
floating over the Sultanas palace. On the 16th the rebels were aboi^ to
advance into the British Agency An office of the British Government and, earlier, of the East India Company. quarter in order to blockade loit ^alali
more effectively, but on the remonstrances of the Political A gen- they
desisted from their intentions. The first reinforcement for the Sultanairived
on the morning of the 17th in the shape of a contingent of Bam Ja
from Tiwi ; and the rebels, almost simultaneously, received a lai^e
addition to their forces. On this day the rebel leade) Muhsi
; Amr waited on Colonel Hayes Sadler and sought to impress on
that the insurrection was a general Hinawi movement for the puipos ^
dethroning the reigning Sultan, but that the tribes of Oman
nothing so much as the friendship and support of the British Government.
In the afternoon the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. visited the Sultan, and the "
enquired whether the Agent could mediate between him and the
Proceedings
on the 14th
of February.
Proceedings
from the 15th
to tlie 17th
February.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎539] (682/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000053> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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