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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎574] (717/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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574
Telegraph
service in
augurated at
Masqat,
1901.
Protection of
British eub-
jects In'Oman
from 1899 to
the pregei.t
time.
Case at Qur.
yat, 1899.
" Baron In-
verdale" case,
1904.
made obligatory on British subjects and British protected persons by a
notification issued by the British Consul at Masqat on the 6th of
July 1903. The Appendix on Epidemics and Sanitary Organisation
deals fully with these and allied matters.
In the Appendix on the Telegraphs of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. will be
found an explanation of the circumstances in which ; in November
1901, 'Oman was brought into telegraphic communication with the
outside world by means of a cable laid from Jashk to Masqat.
After 1899, in consequence of the generally quiet state of the country,
the protection of British subjects in 'Oman and the punishment of
offences against them demanded, but for one case of exceptional gravity,
comparatively little attention. Tribal raids of the ordinary type, however^
continued.
The Sultan, being unable to recover compensation from the tribesmen,
made good out of his own pocket the losses, amounting to nearly §1,200,
of foui Biitish traders of Quryat, whose goods were carried off in
the plunder of the Quryat bazaar in June 1899 by a gang from
Sharqiyah under Hamad, a son of the late Shaikh Salih-bin-'Ali.
< T1:ie most sei, ious case of the period arose from the loss of a British
ship upon the southern coast of Arabia, where the people are wild and
uncivilised, and where the treatment of shipwrecked crews has always been
a matter of grave uncertainty. On the 2nd of August 1903 a French
merchant ship, the "Amiral Gueydon/'having caught fire by an explo
sion, was beached at Ras Hasik. The crew and passengers, 56 persons
m all, were protected by the Sultan's representative in Dhufar and by the
Shaikh of Muibat until the end of the monsoon, and were then despatched
in native boats to Masqat; but upon the way there, in the neighbour-
ood of lias Madrakah, they were picked up at sea by the Russian
steamer « TrouvorExactly a year later, on the 2nd of August 1904,
Baion Im crdale of Ardrossan, a steamer with a registered tonnage
• -I ^ ^ ^ so uls mostly British—on board, struck Jibliyah, an
an o t c K uiia, Mm ia group, with more tragic consequences. Eight
e ailois prefened to remain on the wreck and were taken off it a
fortnight later by the British steamer «Prome," but the rest of the
company left the ship on the 6th of August in two lifeboats, intending
to make for the mainland. The smaller of the boats, which must have
fv. at S1X ^ ersonSj was neve r heard of again; the other, after passing
up e i asirah channel, seems to have been driven about the middle ofs
g upon the north end of Masirah Island, where the 17 occupant
were cruelly massacred by Arabs for the sake of their property. On

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎574] (717/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000076> [accessed 15 November 2018]

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