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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎585] (728/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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585
ihe vicious system of farming the customs, and, by the instrumentality
of two Indian MuhanWans with experience of customs work, whom
he had obtained on his own account from Bombay, introduced in its place
a syaiom of direct management. The customs receipts rose in the first
year to $206,701, of which nearly $190,000 was net revenue, as against
a maximum farm in preceding years of $170,000, and in 1902-03 they
reached the high figure of $285,597 ; but the increase in the returns was
partly countervailed by a continued decline in the value of the dollar. In
1901-02 the ports of Suwaiq, Masna'ah, Barkah and Sur were taken under
direct management, and in 1903 the same system was extended to
Gwadar; owing to the French flag difficulty at Sur, however, there was
not at first any improvement in the receipts at that place. Under the
new regime the customs premises at Masqat, especially the whaif, office,
and warehouses for goods, were very greatly improved. Lord Curzon,
on his visit to Masqat in 1903, strongly advised the Sultan to employ a
financial expert or a competent committee to audit his customs accounts,
but this salutary counsel was disregarded, at least until the Sultan s
system had produced its natural results. In 1905 the Sultan quarrelled
with Muhammad Ibrahim, his Indian superintendent of customs, whose
accounts he distrusted but could not in the absence of independent clerks
disprove, and dismissed him, replacing him by another Indian. Damodai
Dharamsi, a Hindu merchant of Masqat, was at the same time appointed
supervisor of the customs accounts on a salary of Rs. 100 a month,— an
arrangement which, it was feared by the British Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. , would
afford no better guarantee than before against fraud, and might prove to
be the precursor of a return to the farming system. It was at least
clear that, so long as the Sultan continued to prefer loose and irregular
methods, and to borrow through his customs superinten ent rom
merchants who were expecting consignments of dutiable goods, no real
improvement could be expected. An analysis of the customs and ot er
revenue of the 'Oman Sultanate will be found in the general article
relating to it in the (Geographical V olume of this Gazetteer.
In his financial difficulties the Sultan sometimes had recourse to
confiscations, and in 1899 he obtained by this means an estate wor^
$25,000, left by a Baluchi who had been murdered at Sib. The Su an s
liabilities of all sorts, as shown already in connection with British policy,
amounted in 1905 to about Rs. 200 ,000 ; and, though the proportion
(about half) then due to the British Government had by the end of 1
been mostly discharged, it was thought that not much progress had been
made in paying off the remainder. Indeed in 1906 the Sultan was
Sultan's fin
ancial posi
tion.

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
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English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎585] (728/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000081> [accessed 20 February 2018]

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