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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎604] (747/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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604
Sardar
Khan's in
vasion of
South-
Eastern
Persia via
Gwadar and
Chahbar,
1843-44.
Attempt
tie Naib
Kaij on
Gwadar,
1847.
Efforts of
the B;ahuis
to recover
Gwadar,
1857, e'c.
parts of their state, especially upon its western border. Between 1804
and 1807, it is said, Mir Dostain, the Eulaidai chief of Sarbaz, took
possession of Gwadar during the confusion that followed the death of
Saiyid Sultan ; but, if the statement is correct, he was ejected after a
short tenure of the place by troops despatched from Masqat. In 1805
a piratical raid was made on Gwadar by the Qasimi Shaikh of Ras-al-
Khaimah; and about 1839, according to Makrani tradition, Shaikh
Qasim, Gichki, threatened Gwadar and succeeded in obtaining payment
of the Gichki moiety of the revenue on account of two years.
A curious incident, a little later, was an expedition made into South-
Eaetern Persia via Gwadar and Chahbar by ^"ardar Khan, the brother of
His Highness the Agha Khan. At the end of 1843 Sardar Khan left
Karachi with a body of 200 horsemen whom he had collected, and,
marching by land, reached Gwadar at the end of a few weeks. After a
short hait at Gwadar he moved on to Chahbar, which, on account of the
Khojah settlement there, he found a convenient base of operations ; and,
by means of negotiations conducted from Chahbar, he eventually made
himself master of l^ampur. Here however he was besieged by a
Persian army, and, having been obliged to surrender, was removed as a
prisoner to Tehran.
Jn 1847 Faqir Muhammad, the Naib of Kaij, invested Gwadar
with a force of 1,000 men ; his object was to extort from Saiyid Thuwaini,
at. that time regent of ' Oman, a customary annual present which had
been withheld for two years in succession. After the attacks of Faqir
Muhammad had been several times repulsed, the inhabitants of the town,
finding themselves straitened for ammunition and supplies, obtained a
truce ; they then kept the Naib amused with idle promises, and possibly
with small payments, until the arrival of 100 men in the brig " JNasiri"
from Masqat obliged him to relinquish the siege,
+1, i ^ 1S">7 an expedition was organised by Nasir Khan II, partly with
the object of recovering of Gwadar, and was despatched to Kaij under
t le command of Shahghasi ali Muhammad; but the contemplated
attack upon Gwadar was a] parently bought off by the Arab governor,
who presented a nu;r.ber of slaves and a sword to the ruler of Kalat and
possibly paid a sum of money as well. Another expedition against
Gwadar was subsequently planned by Khuda Dad Khan ; but, in conse
quence of tiouble with the Naushairwani tribe of Kharan, it had to be
abandoned.
The claim of Kalat to Gwadar, 1861-63.
he affairs of Gwadar and Chahbar during the following eight
years, from lSfU 1° 1869, were closely connected with the construction
0 . a , e ersian Gulf telegraph, an undertaking which gave rise to some
d'nicult questions of jurisdiction and boundaries.
The preparations for erecting a land line of telegraph from Karachi
to bwadar seem to have inspired the Khan of Kalat with the idea of
reviving, assisted by the British Government, his dormant claim to the

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎604] (747/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x000094> [accessed 22 February 2018]

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