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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎611] (754/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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611
Pelly, the Resident in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. ; but the time for negotiation
was already past. About midnight on the 21st of February Ibrahim
Khan ; s leading troops under the command of Husain Khan of Gaih,
who was acting with the Persians, reached Chahbar; and on the
next day, after a defence of three hours and the loss of several men,
'Abdul 'Aziz evacuated the fort, which he had held with four guns and
a garrison of 30 Arabs and Baluchis, and took refuge on board of a vessel
in the harbour.
Directly the fighting was over the Persians commenced to plunder
the town, from which the British Indian residents had fortunately
sent away their families and much of their property in anticipation of the
attack. To the remonstrances which Major Miles, in accordance with
the instructions of the Government of Bombay, addressed to him from
Gwadar, Ibrahim Khan replied denying the claim of 'Oman to possession
of Chahbar and asserting the title of Persia, which had, he said, been
confirmed by the recent* award of the Perso-Kalat Boundary Commission;
he also complained of the conduct of 'Abdul 'Aziz in confining some
Persian subjects on board of his vessel. After a few cays .. e
Sartip made over charge of the town to Husam Kaan o ai an
departed for Qasrkand in the interior. The proceedings o usam an
were much complained of by the British traders of Chahbar, who were
reducei to great straits for food and at the same time "w rt prcven e
from removing their goods lest they should quit the place Most
British subjects had now taken refuge in the neig i 'om 0 ° . ,
British telegraph station, and, to ensure their safe y, u sv a» i . '
send a vessel of war to the spot; but none was at the moment a^ ailal e.
'Abdul 'Aziz remained for some days on his vessel m the ^ uou ^ .
intercepted specie arriving from abroad, sent boa s to •
assistance from Sur and Khabui-ah in 'Oman, and, on
at least, opened fire on the fort; but his action on y 1 made
enemy without advantage. Meanwhile represen a ion _ r) m P]1 t who
by the British Minister at Tehran to the Persian \ retain
were still in total ignorance of the occurrences at uti a , OT oceed
Miles, the Assistant Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Gwadar, was < m ^ • t | iere
to Chahbar in the despatch vessel " Hugh lose am , twice
until the arrival of a' gunboat. The Persian Prime ^
telegraphed to Husain Khan, whose attitude towaidb j protection
ment was openly Jisrespectful, almost derisive, o a attention to
to British subjects; but the Khan at first p nf apnt orders by
these commands. Eventually the Persian tch a special
courier to the Governor-General of Kirman to c T? r lti s h subjects;
Commissioner to Chahbar to settle the grievances o ^heir normal
and, after this, matters seem to have returned ua > i je on his way
course. In March Ibrahim Khan, who was reported to be ^onn^^y
to Tizto inspect a new fort built there by his or . , ' eI1 t to Hindu
offered immunity from taxation for one year as an 1 losses
traders who had left Chahbar to return. Compensa precautions
sustained by British subjects, which in consequent:e '
*This was of course nonsense. The settlement of on Persian or
and Kalat could not affect the title of Masqat to any place,
the Kalat side of that frontier. 48
Ill-treatment
of British
subjects by
the Persian a
on the occu
pation of
OhaWm*.

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎611] (754/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x00009b> [accessed 24 February 2018]

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