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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎619] (762/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , 'Oman and Baluchistan being assimilated to that held by
the Assistant Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. at Gwadar between 1877 and lb79. This
arrangement, inasmuch as the Director is the head of British tele
graph interests in Makran and possesses special facilities for visiting
the coast in a telegraph vessel, was found convenient; and, with an
interval of a few months in 1884 during which charge of Gwadar was
assumed by the Agent to the Governor-General in Baluchistan,
it remained undisturbed from 1880 onwards.
In 1 877, possibly in connection with the turbulence of the Rinds
near Gwadar, it was arranged to increase the strength of the Assistant
Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. 's military guard to about 24 sepoys ; but the change
did not apparently take effect until the end of 1878. In January 1880
the guard was again reduced to 12, and in December 18SU to 8 men, m
consequence of the extreme unhealthiness of the station; and soon after
wards it was abolished altogether.
In September 1893 the telegraph station at Gwadar was closed, and
a telephone communicating with Chahbar and Ormarah was provided
instead for the use of the Native Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. ; but the arrangement
was not found satisfactory, and in the following year the telegraph
station was re-opened as a combined post and telegraph office.
o
Indian Mili
tary guard,
1877-80.
Telegraph
station at
Gwadar
closed, 1893,
and re-open
ed, 1894.
rwaik dfarn
'Be iDailttr
it bwbfe
Proposals since 1895 for the transfer of Gwadar from t he Sultan
of 'Oman to the Government of India or the Khan of Kalat.
The failure of the Khan of Kalat in 18G1 to recover Gwadar by the
»ood offices of the Government of India has been already mentioned m its
proper place; but it remains to notice some later proposals which weie
made from time to time with the object of abolishing e apparen
anomaly of'Omani sovereignty in Makran.
In 1885 the question was mooted by Sir R. Sandeman, bhen
Affent to the Governor-General in Baluchistan, w 10 eugges e ^ia
the port'should be acquired from the Sultan on a qui -len an lan e(
over for management either to the Khan of Kaa 0 . ■• i
authorities in Baluchistan; but the Government of
the scheme, as they considered that the Bntis occupa ^ nf Kalat
would entail serious responsibilities, and that, even i e a wou u
were disposed to purchase the place, which e was n ^
be impolitic to press the transfer upon the Sultan ot Uman.
The subject was revived in 1891, when the (j()\ cinni< nt o ^
the ground that the Sultan had lately signed an agie i i ^
his own power to dispose of territory and that ^wadar wa. no longer
regarded as of high value to Baluchistaiij again , u i
to obtain a cession of the place. . , .
Between 1900 and 1902 indications were not wanting o an m
in Gwadar on the part o£ Russia a nd Pranc^ ^
India proposed to His Majesty's Governmen 'j' ■' through the
cession of the port on reasonable terms should be made througn

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Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎619] (762/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x0000a3> [accessed 20 February 2018]

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