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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎620] (763/1782)

The record is made up of 2 volumes (1624 pages). It was created in 1915. It was written in English. The original is part of the British Library: India Office The department of the British Government to which the Government of India reported between 1858 and 1947. The successor to the Court of Directors. Records and Private Papers.

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620
khan of Kalat, the necessary funds being- supplied by the Governmenf
of India and the Khan alone appearing in the transaction; the exBendi
ture, it was urged, would be justifiable as an insurance against an
attempt by a foreign power to obtain a footing on the Makran coast
The Home Government, who., in view of the attitude of France in 'Oman'
affairs, did not consider that the question could judiciously be take^i L
in the manner indicated, suggested that an effort should be made instead
to obtain a lease of the Gwadar customs for the Khan of Kalat for a
fixed teim of yeais ; but this alternative did not commend itself to the
Government of India, and the matter accordingly dropped.
[ " September 1908 the Khan of Kalat requested the assistance of
the British Government in obtaining the rendition of Gwadar • and in
January 19 I M the Jam ot Las Bailah also advanced a claim, not seriously
sustainable, to possession of the port, which he alleged that a bride
nom kaiat had brought into his family as a part of her dowry The
Government of 1 ndia, however, decided in 1901. not to take action on
either of these applications; and at this point the question rested.
Renewed trouble witk the Rind tribe, 1891-1894.
Friction with
the Kinds
in 1891 and
1892.
Final settle
ment with
the Rinds,
1894.
Since the beginning of the reign of Saiyid Faisal over 'Oman, peace and
security have ordinarily prevailed at Gwadar; but until 189 4-, notwith
standing the settlement of 1886, friction with the Rinds still occasionally
arose from questions connected with the liberation of slaves. In 1891 the
demeanour of the tribe was discontented and menacing; and the Native
Agent who represented the British Government, and who appeared for that
reason to be m some danger, was ordered to live in the fort; but nothing
happened to justify the apprehensions which had been excited. Again in
11^ t .' : lf R in ds (leniaiKicd the surrender of 70 slaves whom they
alleged to have absconded to Gwadar, threatening incase of refusal to
ciea. t ac is ui uuce, and the situation was sufficiently serious to necessitate
a re-intorcement of the garrison and the despatch of an official of high
aii lorn Oman . 1 , u t ^ subsided for the time on a warning being
conveyed to the Kinds through the Political Agent A mid-ranking political representative (equivalent to a Consul) from the diplomatic corps of the Government of India or one of its subordinate provincial governments, in charge of a Political Agency. in Southern Baluchistan.
>i ing he cold weather of 1892-93 fugitive slaves continued to collect at
.' i <U ' . w u '! 0 1(311 ' nin )hcr in May 1893 amounted to several hundreds;
in i-nrl ^ U T f VaS situation thus created that it was found advisable
• imluce the refugees to remove to British India, and some of them were
n piovided with the means of reaching that destination.
of ^ r011 ^^ e c ontinued at Gwadar, in the form of threats and even
bpo-iim"^ 0U r V ^ ^ 11( ^ 1 & rian t Rind slave owners, until the
" / '".f ' .' w en ' on the loth of Jamiary, a satisfactory settle-
l\t l\ was at leu ^ th negotiated by Captain Ramsay.
so U ' pcm ]lew a ^ 1 " eeiTien t> which was in writing, the Rinds bound them-
ulav^o <) -1 ln I a '?i no , disturbances at Gwadar on account of fugitive
should f"] 1 I! oveinrneri ^ 0 f India undertook that released slaves
' j » ( wed to remain at Gwadar for more than 15 da^s after

About this item

Content

Theses two volumes make up Volume I, Part IA and Part IB (Historical) (pages i-778 and 779-1624) of the Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. , ’Omān and Central Arabia (Government of India: 1915), compiled by John Gordon Lorimer and completed for press by Captain L Birdwood.

Part 1A contains an 'Introduction' (pages i-iii) written by Birdwood in Simla, dated 10 October 1914. There is also a 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Tables' (page v-viii) and 'Detailed Table of Contents' (pages ix-cxxx), both of which cover all volumes and parts of the Gazetteer .

Parts IA and IB consist of nine chapters:

Extent and format
2 volumes (1624 pages)
Arrangement

Volume I, Part I has been divided into two bound volumes (1A and 1B) for ease of binding. Part 1A contains an 'Introduction', 'Table of Chapters, Annexures, Appendices and Genealogical Trees' and 'Detailed Table of Contents'. The content is arranged into nine chapters, with accompanying annexures, that relate to specific geographic regions in the Persian Gulf Historically used by the British to refer to the sea area between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. Often referred to as The Gulf or the Arabian Gulf. . The chapters are sub-divided into numbered periods according, for example, to the reign of a ruler or regime of a Viceroy, or are arbitrarily based on outstanding land-marks in the history of the region. Each period has been sub-divided into subject headings, each of which has been lettered. The annexures focus on a specific place or historical event. Further subject headings also appear in the right and left margins of the page. Footnotes appear occasionally at the bottom of the page to provide further details and references.

Physical characteristics

Foliation: The foliation sequence is circled in pencil, in the top right corner of the recto The front of a sheet of paper or leaf, often abbreviated to 'r'. of each folio. The sequence runs through parts IA and IB as follows:

  • Volume I, Part IA: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 1, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 456. Total number of folios: 456. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 460.
  • Volume I, Part IB: The sequence begins on the first folio with text, on number 457, and ends on the last folio with text, on number 878. It should be noted that folio 488 is followed by folio 488A. Total number of folios: 423. Total number of folios including covers and flysheets: 427.
Written in
English in Latin script
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'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [‎620] (763/1782), British Library: India Office Records and Private Papers, IOR/L/PS/20/C91/1, in Qatar Digital Library <https://www.qdl.qa/archive/81055/vdc_100023575944.0x0000a4> [accessed 20 May 2018]

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